Special Bulletin: Tell Your Congressperson to Increase Federal Student Aid Appropriations

The U.S. House of Representatives’ Committee on Appropriations recently voted to send HR 3358 to the full House for debate and a vote. This bill appropriates funds forIMG_7979 federal student aid programs for federal Fiscal Year (FY) 2018.

Here’s a summary of HR 3358’s key financial aid provisions as currently written. But they’re not final yet, and you should tell your congressperson what you think about them. Visit during their August recess, or call or write them. For their contact information, go here and enter your zip code.

Federal Pell Grant

This program provides grants of $600 to $5,920 to the nation’s neediest students. It has a $4.3 billion surplus that could be used to increase the size of these grants or provide grants to additional needy students.

HR 3358 would reduce this surplus by $3.3 billion and keep Pell Grant amounts the same as they were in FY 2017. With inflation, this would reduce the Pell Grant’s “purchasing power” — the portion of college-related expenses covered by Pell. Furthermore, it would not provide Pell Grants to any more students.

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG)

FSEOG goes to the poorest Pell Grant recipients — mostly those with family incomes below $30,000 per year.

HR 3358 would put the same amount into FSEOG for FY 2018 as that program received for FY 2017. FSEOG would be unable to help any additional students and its purchasing power would diminish

IMG_7978Note: As Pell Grant and FSEOG purchasing power decline, it’ll be necessary for colleges and states to divert more of their grant and scholarship dollars to help Pell and FSEOG-eligible students. This would reduce the numbers of college and state awards available to students who are not needy enough to receive Pell and FSEOG, but who still need plenty of financial assistance to go to or remain in college.

Federal Work-Study (FWS)

Hundreds of thousands of needy college student get part-time jobs through FWS. Most of these jobs are on-campus and many are related to students’ majors.

The administration proposed to cut FWS appropriations by 50%. But HR 3358 rejects this proposal and keeps FY 2018 FWS funding the same as it was for FY 2017. Still, there would be little or no opportunity for additional numbers of students to secure FWS jobs unless the program receives more funding.

Time to Act!

HR 3358 could affect your student’s financial aid even if he doesn’t receive Pell Grant, FSEOG, or FWS. So don’t sit on the sidelines! Make your voice heard!

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