Before College: Prepare Your Freshmen to Manage Those First-Year Finances

Ever noticed college campuses and their surroundings? All those apartments, bookstores, dormitories, shops, and restaurants. They’re run by people called IMG_8045“landlords” and “merchants” — responsible, solid folks who make good friends and neighbors. But, at work, their job is to separate students from their money, and at this they’re exceptionally talented.

Dropping 17-19 year olds amongst these skilled professionals is almost unfair. For all their academic ability and digital literacy, young people on their own for the first time often aren’t savvy about considering, much less comprehending, the consequences of their financial decisions. Result? They can easily become the victims of slick marketing campaigns and peer pressures.

IMG_8046In the short run, this contributes to stress, frantic calls home for more money, skipping meals, borrowing too much, working too much, and even dropping out. In the long run, it’s one reason why 40% of college students don’t get degrees, 45% of college graduates live with their parents two years after commencement, and 50% of college graduates need financial help from their families.

Fortunately, today’s students and parents are generally close, so your students often want your guidance. This allows you to use your experience from decades of managing (and mismanaging) your money to help them avoid mistakes in managing theirs.

They’ve probably learned some things by observing you. Still, there are important matters you should make absolutely sure they understand — through frank discussions before they go to campus, by “just in time” phone counseling while they’re at school, or both. Here are some of these issues:

Budgeting: How and why to map out monthly income and expenses, track spending, routinely review and modify budgets.

Checking Accounts, Credit and Debit Cards: How to write checks and use debit/credit cards. Associated fees. Avoiding impulse purchases. When credit card interest kicks in and when to make credit card payments.

Comparative Shopping: How and why to comparatively shop for everything from checking and savings accounts to credit/debit cards to apartments, books, and clothes.

ID Theft and Scams: Securing their checkbooks and credit/debit cards. Avoiding scams. Protecting their critical personal information. What to do if their ID is stolen.

Saving: Why and how to save, even if only a little for a short time. How to open and manage savings account

Teaching your students about these first-year financial issues can protect them, and you, this year and for years to come!

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