Before and During College: Parent Loans — Helpful Today, But a Potential Curse Tomorrow

IMG_1169Federal Direct Parent PLUS Loans. They’re often the way families fill the gap between their resources, financial aid, and costs their undergraduates incur at college. But parent PLUS loans have their pros and cons.

Parent PLUS loan advantages:

  • There’s no PLUS borrowing limit other than the cost of attendance for the student for whom you borrow (i.e. your “beneficiary”) minus her other financial aid.
  • The interest rate on each academic year’s PLUS loan is fixed so, unlike this rate on many private loans, it’ll never go up.
  • The only fee is a 1.069% federal loan fee.
  • Amounts you repay within 120 days of disbursement reduces principal and IMG_1150cancels interest and loan fee on that principal.
  • Your payments may be deferred while your beneficiary is enrolled at least half-time and during her 6-month post half-time grace period.
  • Payments may also be postponed under other federal deferment and forbearance programs.
  • Should you die or become totally and permanently disabled, or if your beneficiary dies, your PLUS debt will be discharged.

Parent PLUS loan downsides include:

  • The highest interest rate of all federal college loans. Currently 7.0%, this rate’s expected to rise on PLUS loans borrowed for the next few academic years. But with fixed rates, PLUS interest is still likely to be lower than variable rate private education loans.
  • To borrow a PLUS loan, you (or a cosigner) must have a sound credit history. IMG_1152Your credit history isn’t “sound” for PLUS if (1) when your credit report runs, you don’t owe over $2,085 that’s 90 or more days delinquent, or (2) for five years before your report runs, you’ve had no charge-offs, bankruptcies, defaults, foreclosures, repossessions, tax-liens, wage garnishments, or write-offs.
  • PLUS debt isn’t legally transferable to anyone else unless it’s privately refinanced.
  • Parent PLUS debt isn’t easily forgiven. Bankruptcy generally won’t discharge it, and it’s not eligible for the federal teacher loan forgiveness program. But, in addition to the discharges described above, it is eligible for Public Service Loan Forgiveness.

IMG_1151Borrow parent PLUS loans only as a resort, especially if you’re approaching retirement. Why? The Government Accountability Office recently found 17% of 65-74 year old parent borrowers had defaulted on such loans — subjecting themselves to expensive collection fees and the confiscation of their Social Security benefits and tax refunds. So while PLUS can be helpful today, it can be a curse tomorrow.

Note: College Affordability Solutions will be on “spring break” next week and so won’t be posting a blog. But look here again on Wednesday, March 21, for another post on issues related to keeping college affordable.

Contact College Affordability Solutions at (512) 366-5354 or if you’re looking for a no-cost consultation on strategies for minimizing college costs.


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