During College: Advise Your Student to Avoid Dropping Courses, Especially Late In The Term!

The end of another academic term is approaching, and students struggling with courses are no doubt assessing their options. Should they drop these courses? IMG_1947Probably not.

Dropping now is a bad idea for several reasons:

  • Students who drop courses late in a term usually receive little or no refund of tuition and fees paid for the courses. So they get no return on the money they invested, and repeated drops can force them to enroll for one or more additional terms, costing them thousands in extra tuition, fees, and other costs of attendance.
  • If dropped courses are necessary to satisfy academic requirements — either in the “core” curriculum or to fulfill the demands of a student’s major — the student will eventually have to retake them or similar courses. Result? The student pays twice to complete requirements once.
  • Dropping courses can also jeopardize financial aid eligibility. To get federal aid, Washington requires a student to meet institutional standards for Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) toward graduation. These standards — usually postedIMG_1948 on financial aid office websites — obligate the student to successfully complete a certain percentage of the courses in which she enrolls. Many scholarship providers, schools, and states apply similar requirements for their aid programs. But if dropping would put a student below these percentages, she could lose future financial aid.

Because of all this, students should avoid the temptation to drop in order to avert grades that are good but, for whatever reasons, aren’t considered good enough. Some students, for example, can’t tolerate anything less than an A for reasons of personal pride. Others may worry that Bs or Cs will ruin their graduate or professional school applications.

Is there ever a time when a student should consider dropping a course? Yes. SAP also requires at least a 2.0 undergraduate Grade Point Average (GPA), and most institutions have minimum GPAs that students must remain at or above in order to remain enrolled. If a student is certain her final grade in a course will put her below these minimums, dropping may be her best option.

Students may appeal lost aid if they fail to maintain SAP. These appeal processes are usually described on aid office websites. Successful appeals generally (a) document extraordinary circumstances (e.g. illness or family emergency) that undermined academic performance and (b) describe steps the student has taken to overcome these circumstances.

IMG_1949Instead of dropping, it’s usually better to seek academic assistance — and to do so ASAP. Visit with the instructor, get a tutor, join a study group, consult an academic advisor or campus counselor, etc. These actions can go a long way toward avoiding all the costly negatives stemming from a dropped course!

 

Got questions about how to avoid making college attendance more expensive than it needs to be? Contact College Affordability Solutions for a free consultation at (512) 366-5354 or https://collegeafford.com.

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