Before, During and After College: White House Proposals Would Slash and Burn Federal Student Aid

The Trump administration recently sent Congress it’s proposed 2019-20 federal budget and put forth a related proposal to reduce what graduate students and parents may borrow from the Federal Direct Loan Program (FDLP) to an undisclosed amount.

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos announced the budget plan would provide “freedom for America’s students to pursue their lifelong learning journeys in the ways and places that work best for them. . . .” And Ivanka Trump, who helped craft the loan reduction plan, said “we need to modernize our higher-education system to make it more affordable. . . .”

Unfortunately, these schemes would make postsecondary learning less, not more affordable. Specifics:

Federal Direct Loan Program (FDLP): Besides reducing graduate student and parent loans, under the president’s budget plan Americans borrowing their first FDLP loans after June 2020 would face:

Increased Borrowing Costs: The administration would end FDLP Subsidized loans on which no interest is charged until six months after their financially needy undergraduate borrowers leave school. At current interest rates, this would cause a typical undergraduate to repay at least 8% more than he now does.

Limited Repayment Options: All borrowers would be forced into a new Income-Driven Repayment (IDR) plan with payments equalling 12.5% of discretionary income (generally defined as AGI minus 150% of poverty level).

Loss of Loan Forgiveness: Public Service Loan Forgiveness would be eliminated, and IDR would forgive any undergraduate debts that might remain after 15 years of payment, while graduate students could get forgiven on on what they still owe after paying for 30 years. This means borrowers would pay more and have less forgiven.

Tuition and Fee Increases: The budget proposal would force postsecondary schools to pay the government for FDLP loans whose borrowers default. The exact amount of such payments is not yet set, but this would no doubt force many schools to raise their prices so they can set money aside for this purpose.

Federal Pell Grant: This year the maximum Pell Grant is $6,095. Next year it’ll be $6,195. The Trump team wants to cut this maximum by 17%, to $5,135, in 2020-21, with smaller Pell awards suffering proportionally similar cuts.

Nowadays, Pell Grants are for community college, university, and trade and technical school undergraduates whose families can cover just 22% or less of their postsecondary costs. While cutting Pell appropriations by 1%, the Trump budget would extend Pell eligibility to enrollees in short-term credentialing and licensing programs — diverting Pell funds that could otherwise go to high-need associate’s and bachelor’s degree students.

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG): The proposed budget would eliminate all $840 million in funding for the SEOG program, which targets extra grant funds to the poorest Pell recipient. These students typically receive the maximum Pell Grant. But the average public 4-year college costs covered by those grants have declined from 43% to 24% in 20 years, making SEOG more important than ever.

Federal Work-Study (FWS): Right now FWS matches what on and off-campus employers pay students for part-time jobs. This helps students borrow less, learn marketable skills and make professional contacts to use when applying to graduate schools or jobs after college. The budget proposal would slash FWS appropriations by 56%, from $1.13 billion this year to $500 million for 2019-20.

These changes have little chance of making their way into the federal budget, but Congress could weave them into the Higher Education Act, which it’s now working to rewrite. So students and parents may wants to contact their U.S. House members and Senators to share their thoughts on these proposals!

If you need more information, feel free to contact College Affordability Solutions.

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