Before and During College: Help Your Student Avoid Credit Card Traps

There’s nothing inherently wrong with college students having credit cards. In fact, 56% of them posses at least one. But help your student beware of all those offers from banks and other credit card providers at this time of year.

After all, a credit card is an opportunity to rapidly amass high interest debt, and only predatory lenders would push such an opportunity at a naive 18-24 year-old with no regular income. In the words of Bernie Sanders:

What the . . . credit card companies are doing is not really much different from what gangsters and loan sharks do. . . . While bankers . . . don’t break the knee caps of those who can’t pay back, they still are destroying peoples’ lives.

IMG_8287So advise your student to ignore those unsolicited offers. Just the act of applying for multiple cards within a short period can cause her credit rating to take a dive. Instead, advise her to carefully search for and start with a single credit card — one without annual fees and, if study-abroad is in her future, without foreign transaction fees. Adding another credit card later is an option that can actually help build up her credit rating, but only after she’s learned the ropes.

There’s more danger, of course, once your student obtains a credit card. It poses an almost irresistible temptation to a young person facing the pressures of keeping up with more affluent peers in an environment full of spending opportunities.

In short, a credit card makes it far too easy to shell out too much. The credit card IMG_8288provider hopes she’ll do this, because then it gets to add interest and fees that may exceed 20% of whatever’s unpaid by the monthly due date. Her credit rating gets damaged, too. To keep this from happening, the provider figures you’ll cover the unpaid balance for her.

Still, when properly managed, a credit card offers certain benefits — funding for emergencies, small savings if it’s a reward card, a record of purchases. Moreover, if paid in full every month, your student will establish a strong credit score that’ll help her borrow for a car, home, and other big post-college purchases.

Help protect your student from the dangers and reap the benefits described above! Be assertive in coaching her about credit card management both before and after she goes to campus. Make sure her college credit experience is a good one!

Contact College Affordability Solutions at (512) 366-5354 or collegeafford.gmail.com for more information about how students and families can manage college-related expenses well.

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Before College: Prepare Your Freshmen to Manage Those First-Year Finances

Ever noticed college campuses and their surroundings? All those apartments, bookstores, dormitories, shops, and restaurants. They’re run by people called IMG_8045“landlords” and “merchants” — responsible, solid folks who make good friends and neighbors. But, at work, their job is to separate students from their money, and at this they’re exceptionally talented.

Dropping 17-19 year olds amongst these skilled professionals is almost unfair. For all their academic ability and digital literacy, young people on their own for the first time often aren’t savvy about considering, much less comprehending, the consequences of their financial decisions. Result? They can easily become the victims of slick marketing campaigns and peer pressures.

IMG_8046In the short run, this contributes to stress, frantic calls home for more money, skipping meals, borrowing too much, working too much, and even dropping out. In the long run, it’s one reason why 40% of college students don’t get degrees, 45% of college graduates live with their parents two years after commencement, and 50% of college graduates need financial help from their families.

Fortunately, today’s students and parents are generally close, so your students often want your guidance. This allows you to use your experience from decades of managing (and mismanaging) your money to help them avoid mistakes in managing theirs.

They’ve probably learned some things by observing you. Still, there are important matters you should make absolutely sure they understand — through frank discussions before they go to campus, by “just in time” phone counseling while they’re at school, or both. Here are some of these issues:

Budgeting: How and why to map out monthly income and expenses, track spending, routinely review and modify budgets.

Checking Accounts, Credit and Debit Cards: How to write checks and use debit/credit cards. Associated fees. Avoiding impulse purchases. When credit card interest kicks in and when to make credit card payments.

Comparative Shopping: How and why to comparatively shop for everything from checking and savings accounts to credit/debit cards to apartments, books, and clothes.

ID Theft and Scams: Securing their checkbooks and credit/debit cards. Avoiding scams. Protecting their critical personal information. What to do if their ID is stolen.

Saving: Why and how to save, even if only a little for a short time. How to open and manage savings account

Teaching your students about these first-year financial issues can protect them, and you, this year and for years to come!