During College: Help Your Student Avoid Overspending on Holiday Gifts

On average, Americans will spend $983 for holiday gifts this year. For those pressed for funds, even a fraction of this amount can create a new year filled with the stress of buyer’s remorse, exorbitant credit card bills, and insufficient funds for necessities.

IMG_0205Such problems overwhelm many college students just as a new term begins. Stress is the number one impediment to academic success in college. And the top two reasons why college students drop out are their need to work and earn money, and their inability to pay tuition and fees.

But you, as a parent, can help your student avoid overspending on holiday gifts.

First, manage expectations before the gift exchange. Thoughtful gifts don’t need to cost a lot. Tell your student he need not buy expensive presents. Quietly remind family members he can’t afford to spend a ton and, if your family members share holiday wish lists, lobby for some low-cost items he can afford.

Second, coach you student to establish a realistic gift budget fitting his limited finances, omitting gifts to casual friends, and dedicating a certain amount for each person on his list.

Retail businesses are exceptionally good at separating consumers from their money. IMG_0206So help your student avoid getting hoodwinked by marketing strategies designed to entice more spending than he can afford — constant sales, decoy pricing, loss leaders, loyalty cards, retail credit, etc.

Counsel your student to minimize extra fees — convenience fees, credit card fees, service charges, shipping costs, etc. Paying with cash or a debit card can avoid some of these fees. Comparative shopping can help avoid or diminish others, especially if shopping online.

Encourage him to limit self-gifting — i.e. treating himself to something while shopping for others. Whatever he’d buy can probably go on his holiday wish list.

Urge him to pick up some seasonal work to earn a few bucks that’ll help cover gifts and other holiday expenses.

Advise your student to track holiday spending. It’s helpful to establish a gift budget, but only if he stays within it. Tracking his expenditures, which simply requires a pencil and paper, helps him do this.

Finally, remind your student that spending restraint is critical to a truly happy new year!

College Affordability Solutions can provide other strategies for helping to keep your student’s costs low. Feel free to call (512) 366-5354 or email collegeafford@gmail.com for a no-cost consultation.

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During College: Your Undergraduate Needs a Spending Plan!

Last week’s post discussed how every $100 prepaid within 120 days after her fall Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan funds are disbursed can reduce an undergraduate’s repayment amount by an additional $175. Urge your student to make such a prepayment. But remember, she shouldn’t prepay loan funds she’ll need.

IMG_9872How can she know what she’ll need? The best way is for you, as a loving parent, to use your real world experience to help her create an effective spending plan (also known as a budget, though many students consider that a dirty word, right up there with terms like diet and pop quiz!).

A great time to do this is when she’s home for Thanksgiving in a few weeks. Here are key components:

  • Time Period: Make the plan for the right time period. That’s at least each academic term but, if your student depends heavily on financial aid, it should probably stretch to when she’ll receive such aid for the next term.
  • Time Increments: Split the plan into weekly or monthly increments and use it to anticipate each increment’s income and expenses, which may vary by week or month.
  • Income: Plug in funds your student will receive — financial aid, take-home pay, money from you or other family members, savings withdrawals, etc.
  • Expenses: Help your student break down what she needs to spend in each increment. The U.S Education Department offers great guidance on what to include in a student’s spending plan and on building a spending plan.
  • Needs versus Wants: It’s hard, but help her separate needs (crucial necessities) from wants (spending on goods and services your student could get through college without).
  • Savings: Coach your student to stash away some money for emergencies; also for predictable future spending — travel between school and home, holiday and other gifts, maybe even spring break.
  • Review and Adjust: Your student’s actual income and outlays since leaving for IMG_9873college can help predict income and expenses for upcoming time increments. Review her fall pay stubs, credit/debit card records, and even paper notes on cash outlays. At the end of each of the next few months, help her compare such records to her plan, then refine her plan as necessary.

An effective spending plan will benefit your student during and after college. Help her learn how to build and execute one. It’ll be some of the best parental support you’ll ever provide.

College Affordability Solutions will help you tailor various strategies for making higher education more affordable. And to make sure the price of our services doesn’t become an impediment to them, they’re all provided at no charge. Call (512) 366-5354 or email collegeafford@gmail.com to access these services.