During College: Strategies for Your College Finance Plan

Your College Finance Plan (CFP) needs strategies for you and you student toIMG_9592 implement before, during, and after college. Let’s look at the “During College” phase.

Research at a major university indicates that, looking back, almost 4 out of every 10 seniors conclude part or all of their student loans weren’t essential for their educations. Therefore, some of these strategies focus on personal money management so students can spend and borrow less of the interest-bearing educational debt that, over time, increases college costs. These include:

IMG_9555Also, the faster your student gets her degree, the less cost and debt she’ll incur. Still, the latest national data show that only 39.8% of undergraduates earn their bachelor’s degrees within 4 years. Here are some strategies that’ll help your student graduate on-time, if not before:

 

Look here for why you need a CFP. You can find summaries of strategies for your plan’s “Before College” phase here. And next Wednesday there’ll be samples of “After College” strategies for your CFP here.
Beginning October 16, check this website every Wednesday for a more detailed account of a strategy you may want to use in your CFP’s before, during, or after college phase.

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Before and During College: Beginning October 1, File Your 2018-19 FAFSA ASAP!

IMG_8872If you’ll have a student in college between July 2018 and June 2019, apply for financial aid on October 1 or as soon thereafter as possible. That’s when the 2018-19 Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) first becomes available to you on the government’s secure FAFSA website.

Why hurry? Regardless of institutional FAFSA deadlines, some schools quietly use FAFSA submission dates to determine the order in which they award institutional grants and scholarships, so those submitting FAFSAs early may have a better shot at these limited funds. Also, if your FAFSA data are selected for verification, early submission gives you more time to gather and supply documents you need.

No worries if your student doesn’t yet know where she’ll attend college next year. She can direct her FAFSA to 10 different institutions, and more later if needed.

The 2018-19 FAFSA needs 2016 federal 1040 data. The easiest, most accurate way to get this is to use the IRS Data Retrieval Tool (DRT). For 2018-19, there’ll be an opportunity to do this in the FAFSA’s student and parent Financial Information sections.

If you previously submitted a FAFSA but your student qualified for nothing but federal loans, why submit again? Two reasons. First, even small changes in your family and financial situations can impact eligibility for need-based grants, scholarships, and part-time work study jobs. Second, your student won’t re-qualify for past loan awards without a new FAFSA.

There are online answers to various FAFSA questions you may have including, but not limited to:

All colleges require the FAFSA, but some may require other forms to apply for state or institutional aid. Check on this with the financial aid office wherever your student may attend.

Two final notes:IMG_8873

  • If you don’t yet have an FSA ID, you’ll need it to do the FAFSA. Establish it at FAFSA.ed.gov.
  • Be sure to do your FAFSA at FAFSA.ed.gov. Otherwise, you may get scammed into paying a fee to submit this free form.

Hard to believe it’s already time to apply for next year’s financial aid, isn’t it? But remember, the early bird gets the worm . . . and better yet, the financial aid!

College Affordability Solutions brings 40 years experience to advising families on issues related to financial aid. Got questions? Call (512) 366-5354 or email collegeafford@gmail.com for a no-fee consultation.

Special Bulletin: IRS Data Retrieval Tool Back On-Line for Income-Driven Repayment Applications

Good news! The IRS Data Retrieval Tool (DRT) is once again operable for federal student loan borrowers requesting Income-Driven Repayment (IDR) plans.

When such borrowers apply for IDR plans on their federal student loans, they must provide information to the U.S. Department of Education data from their recent tax returns. The DRT the easiest and fastest way to do this but, in early March, the IRS made the DRT inoperable due to security concerns.

Now, new encryption has been added to the DRT. The Department of Education and IRS will also be back on-line to provide tax return data for the 2018-19 Free Application for Student Financial Aid (FAFSA) when that form becomes available this coming October 1.

Special Bulletin: Status of IRS Data Retrieval Tool

A key tool used by students seeking financial aid borrowers applying for income-driven repayment plans on their federal student loans is still offline. However, a new government announcement outlines a schedule for getting it back up and running.

In March, the government shut down the IRS Data Retrieval Tool (DRT), expressing concerns about the need for extra system security. Here’s where things are now according to a recent status announcement from the U.S. Department of Education —

DRT in October for Student Financial Aid Applicants: For the next 5 months, students will need to keep finding and using recent federal tax returns for themselves and their parents in order to accurately complete their Free Applications for Federal Student Aid (FAFSAs). The government’s announcement says it’ll be October 1 when a new, more secure DRT will become available to them.

DRT on May 31 for Student Loan Borrowers: Parents and ex-students seeking to certify their eligibility for one of the 4 federal student loan income-driven repayment plans will again be able to access to the DRT beginning May 31, the announcement says. Until then, they’ll need to keep submitting alternative documentation when applying for these plans. Alternative documentation could be paper copies of their federal tax returns or pay stubs.

If and when more information about this problem becomes available, College Affordability Solutions will post another bulletin.

Special Bulletin: IRS Data Retrieval Tool Offline Until October!

Remember back on March 18, when there was the bulletin about the IRS shutting down the Data Retrieval Tool (DRT) Americans use to load key data onto their FAFSAs? Now, the IRS and U.S. Department of Education announced that parents and students should plan for the DRT to be offline until the next Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) cycle begins on October 1m.

ED and IRS reminded parent and students that the online FAFSA continues to operate and that, to load data onto that FAFSA that would have come from the DRT, they can access paper copies of their federal tax returns and/or pay stubs, then manually transfer those data to their FAFSAs.

FAFSA filers can also get their 2015 “tax transcripts” from the IRS in order to secure the data they need. These transcripts can be downloaded online from the IRS’s Get Transcript Online website.

College Affordability Solutions will keep you posted on new developments regarding this problem in future bulletins that will be posted on this website.

Before College: Should You File a Financial Aid Appeal?

Your 2017-18 Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) — despite all the information it collects, it can’t cover everything. It doesn’t gather unusual information that could impact your student’s Expected Family Contribution (EFC) — the key to determining his eligibility for financial aid awarded on the basis of financial need.

Since 2015 ended, did you suffer:

  • A big income loss — a layoff or employment termination — that’s still affecting IMG_5702you; or
  • Any major uninsured medical expenses in 2015, 2016, or 2017; or
  • Similarly unavoidable financial problems?

If so, appeal. These may lower your student’s EFC, qualifying her for more need-based aid.

The financial aid office can tell you how to do an appeal. You’ll no doubt be asked to file it in writing and to provide documents proving your income reduction, medical bills, or other financial losses. Why? Because parties funding your student’s need-based aid often audit EFCs. If they’re not convinced that your student’s EFC is correct, the school becomes liable for need-based aid it gives him in excess of his resulting financial need.

DOG_ATTACKKeep copies of the documents you submitted with your appeal. You might need to them to respond to follow-up questions from the aid office.

Because there are so many appeals at this time of year, file yours as soon as possible to give the aid office’s staff sufficient time to review it and make a determination before May 1. That’s when your student must make a go/no-go decision about which 4-year college in which she’ll enroll next fall, and you don’t want this decision made without knowing her financial aid situation.

If your student’s EFC should be changed, the aid office will tell your student. And should additional need-based aid still be available, it’ll send him a revised financial aid award letter showing changes in such aid.

Remember, the EFC can’t be lowered for small, optional, or routine financial matters. A successful appeal will document that your situation is exceptional and unavoidable — e.g. medical bills aren’t for something like elective cosmetic surgery. It’ll also demonstrate that your situation significantly impacts your ability to help pay your student’s college costs — i.e. the loss you’ve suffered costs more than just a few hundred dollars.

If you meet these criteria, file an appeal ASAP. It could make a difference!

Questions about the financial aid process? Contact College Affordability Solutions for a free consultation at (512) 366-5354 or collegeafford@gmail.com.

Special Bulletin: IRS Data Retieval Tool for FAFSA Not Working

Hopefully you filed your 2017-18 FAFSA many weeks or months ago. If you haven’t filed it yet, you’re going to hit a snag just as we reach many college and state deadlines for getting priority to receive various forms of financial aid.

The IRS has announced that it, “. . . decided to temporarily suspend the Data Retrieval Tool (DRT) as a precautionary step following concerns that information from the tool could potentially be misused by identity thieves.”

The DRT is the mechanism through which most students ensure that key fields on their Free Applications for Student Financial Aid (FAFSAs) are accurately populated with data. FAFSA information is used by the U.S. Department of Education (ED) and colleges to determine how much need-based financial aid students may receive for IMG_56692017-18.

While the DRT has worked well in past years, nobody knows when it will begin operating again for 2017-18 FAFSAs. Some colleges and states are changing their FAFSA priority deadlines because of this failure. In Texas, for example, the state is allowing colleges to suspend its March 15 deadline. So check with the school(s) your student may attend during the upcoming academic year.

If necessary, get a copy of your 2015 federal tax returns out of your records and manually enter data required by the FAFSA. Do this as soon as you can because, if you miss the school or state’s FAFSA priority deadline, your student will go to the end of the line for certain grants, scholarships, loans, or work-study awards.

College Affordability Solutions will publish another special bulletin when the DRT is back up and running.