Special Bulletin: Help’s Available for Current and Ex-College Students Affected by Hurricane Harvey

 

A little-known fact is that the U.S. Department of Education (ED) has policies in place to help currently-enrolled college students hurt by federally-declared natural disasters such as Hurricane Harvey. These policies also provide relief to disaster-affected ex-students and parents struggling to repay their federal loans.

A description of these policies, and what should be done to use them, is available on the Federal Student Aid (FSA) Programs’ Hurricane Harvey web page. Texas counties that have been declared federal disaster areas are listed on the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Hurricane Harvey web page.

Here are some examples these policies:

  • Aid Eligibility: Harvey will no doubt undermine the ability of many families to come up with the money they planned to provide their students for the 2017-18 academic year. Students from such families should file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to request aid. If they’ve already filed their FAFSAs, students should contact their campus financial aid offices to learn what documentation is needed for them to request “professional judgment” reviews that can determine if they qualify for additional financial aid.
  • Damaged or Lost Documents: Sometimes students are required provide certain documents before getting their aid to verify the accuracy of their FAFSA data. If these documents have been damaged or lost due to Harvey, students should notify their financial aid offices. ED has given those offices the authority to not require those documents in such situations.
  • Dropping Out: Some student who’ve already received their fall financial aid may need to drop out to go home and help their families recover from Harvey. Such students should contact their financial aid offices and let them know why they are dropping out. In these circumstances, ED allows schools to waive a regulatory requirement that usually compels drop-outs to pay back federal grants received for the fall.
  • Temporary Postponement of Loan Payments: Many ex-student and parent borrowers are likely to find their ability to make federal educational loan payments disrupted because Harvey adversely affected them. Such borrowers should contact the “loan servicers” (contractors Washington hired to collect their federal debts) and request “administrative forbearances.” These forbearance allow affected borrowers to postpone their federal education loan payments for up to three months. Ex-students can get contact information for their loan servicers through the government’s National Student Loan Data System.

In the wake of all the problems stemming from Hurricane Harvey, current and ex-student borrowers who need help should review and use these policies!

Contact College Affordability Solutions at (512) 366-5354 or collegeafford@gmail.com.

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Federal Student Loan Consolidation Disadvantages

Consolidating your federal student loans has many advantages. There are also some disadvantages to be considered before making the choice to consolidate:

(1) You May Pay More in the Long Run: Consolidating generally lowers your monthly thrm34yz8xpayments by giving you extra years to repay. But the longer you take to repay, the more of your lifetime income that goes to repayment.

The “Total Amount Paid” column on your Federal Student Loan Repayment Estimator can show how much you’ll on your loans and consolidated versions of your loans.

On the other hand, federal loans may always be prepaid without penalty, and paying your debt down faster than required will reduce your total amount paid.

(2) No More Perkins Cancellation/Discharge: If you consolidate Federal Perkins Loan debt, your access to the Perkins Loan Cancellation and Discharge programs goes away. These programs write off all or part of your Perkins debt in return for working in certain occupations, with a portion of the debt written off annually. These programs are the surest way to have student debt cancelled or discharged so, if you borrowed Perkins Loans, think carefully before consolidating them.

(3) Monthly Payments Could Start Earlier: Normally, federal student loan payments aren’t required during a 6-month grace period that begins when you graduate, withdraw, or drop below half-time enrollment. But consolidation repayment starts 60 days after the loan is made. If you’re applying for consolidation before your grace period ends, you may keep the full period by asking for repayment to be delayed until that period ends.

(4) Federal Loans Only, Please: State and private education loans aren’t eligible for federal consolidation. And, oh yeah, you’ll need to resolve any federal loan defaults you might have before you may consolidate them.

(5) Beware of Private Consolidations: Banks and other financial services companies can page_federal_versus_privateconsolidate your federal student loans, but you probably don’t want them to. Why? You’ll likely lose all or most of the benefits of borrowing from the government. Check this out carefully before you even consider private consolidation.

(6) For Your Loans Only: A borrower may only have his or her own federal loans consolidated. This means students and parents cannot consolidate their federal educational debts, nor can spouses.

(7) All Consolidations Are Final: You can’t reverse the process. Once a Federal Direct Consolidation Loan pays off your other federal student loans, those debts no longer exist.

Despite these drawbacks and limitations, there are lots of advantages to consolidating federal student loans. Don’t take a pass on consolidation before reviewing them.

 College Affordability Solutions can help you better understand the pros and cons of federal student loan consolidation. Call (512) 366-5354 or email collegeafford@gmail.com.