Before College: New Baby? Start Investing for College Now!

When your family assembles for dinner next Thursday, will a newborn be among the blessings for which you give thanks? If so, congratulations!

IMG_0042Of course you want that baby to lead a life of achievement, fulfillment, and prosperity. To do that it’ll need, as President Lyndon B. Johnson said, all the education it can take. For as he observed, “education is no longer a luxury. Education in this day and age is a necessity.”

Mr. Johnson was referring to postsecondary education. It’s costly now and it’ll be even more expensive when your baby is 18. If current trends continue, freshman year at a public 4-year college or university in 2034-35 will average $59,111 — 71% of what’s projected to then be median household income.

So if you’re like most Americans, you’ll not be able to cover all these costs from what you earn while your child’s in college. Therefore, you need to begin investing for college now.

Consider this: if you can only afford is to deposit $100 a month in a regular 1% IMG_0044interest-bearing savings account through your newborn’s 22nd year, you’ll generate $29,500 for college. If, on the other hand, your baby borrows $29,500, even at today’s student loan interest rates, repaying that debt could cost as much as $48,472.

Also, research shows that low and moderate-income students are three time more likely to enroll in and 4.5 time more likely to graduate from college if they have college savings accounts.

There are investment opportunities that generate much higher returns than a regular savings account. However, your unique needs and circumstances should guide your college investment strategies, and rules regarding these opportunities constantly fluctuate. So if you can afford it, you may want to consult a qualified investment professional before making this choice. Another good source of information is the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority’s Saving for College website and its related links.

You’ll want to employ various strategies to help make the rising price of postsecondary education more affordable, but Investing should always be among them. And the longer your money is invested, the more it’ll generate for your child’s education. So start putting aside as much as you can afford now!

If you have questions about other ways to help make your child’s college education more affordable, College Affordability Solutions provides free consultations. Seek these by calling (512) 366-5354 emailing collegeafford@gmail.com.

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During College: Strategies for Your College Finance Plan

Your College Finance Plan (CFP) needs strategies for you and you student toIMG_9592 implement before, during, and after college. Let’s look at the “During College” phase.

Research at a major university indicates that, looking back, almost 4 out of every 10 seniors conclude part or all of their student loans weren’t essential for their educations. Therefore, some of these strategies focus on personal money management so students can spend and borrow less of the interest-bearing educational debt that, over time, increases college costs. These include:

IMG_9555Also, the faster your student gets her degree, the less cost and debt she’ll incur. Still, the latest national data show that only 39.8% of undergraduates earn their bachelor’s degrees within 4 years. Here are some strategies that’ll help your student graduate on-time, if not before:

 

Look here for why you need a CFP. You can find summaries of strategies for your plan’s “Before College” phase here. And next Wednesday there’ll be samples of “After College” strategies for your CFP here.
Beginning October 16, check this website every Wednesday for a more detailed account of a strategy you may want to use in your CFP’s before, during, or after college phase.

Before, During, and After College: You Need a Plan!

About 4 million babies will be born in the U.S. this year. Naturally, their parents want each of them to enjoy the American dream. Now, more than ever, that dream includes, even depends on a good education beyond high school.

But the dream is unraveling. It’s coming undone as the rising cost of college outpaces all but the wealthiest families’ ability to pay for it.

In 1998, the total cost of a year at a state college or university averaged $10,458. That was 27% of IMG_9377U.S. median household income. Eighteen years later this cost was $24,610, or 42% of median household income. At this rate, freshman year public college expenses for 2017’s newborns will average $33,224 — an astounding 56% of median household income.

Small wonder educational debt for recent college graduates averaged $34,000, or that 44 million Americans owe $1.4 trillion in such debt. Nor is it surprising that, in 2015, there were a million fewer students in college than in 2010; the first ever 5-year drop in our nation’s college enrollment.

How to ensure your child can afford college when he or she is ready to attend? It won’t be simple, and it won’t be easy. But a College Finance Plan (CFP) can help.

A CFP is like a mortgage — a decades-long undertaking. You (the parent) and your student (son or daughter) are its key players. It involves nothing exotic or fancy; just strategies to be adopted before, during, and after actual college enrollment. You’ll want to start implementing these strategies as early as you can, and stick to them.

A CFP won’t make college free, or even inexpensive. But collectively, its strategies can help make college costs more manageable so your student can access the best possible postsecondary education.

Want a quick look at strategies you should consider for the “Before College” phase? See Before College: Strategies for Your College Finance Plan. A review of “During College” strategies will be posted on this website October 2, and “After College” strategies will be outlined here October 9. IMG_9373You’ll also find more in-depth discussions of individual strategies here through the end of academic year 2017-18.

No matter where you and your student are in the college-going process, itake concrete steps to keep the cost of a postsecondary degree within your means. Start building your CFP now!

Got questions about college costs and how to deal with them? Contact College Affordability Solutions at (512) 366-5354 or collegeafford@gmail.com for help at no charge.

Before College: Strategies for Your College Finance Plan

It’s best to begin your College Finance Plan’s (CFP’s) “Before College” phase when your child is born, if not before. But don’t give up if you didn’t. Instead, get going as soon as you can.

Consider initiating these strategies as your student gets closer and closer to college:

Birth through Junior High:

  • Invest and Save. Let time multiply your money, even if you can only put away a little. For example, a $50 month deposit into a 1% savings account beginning at birth will yield $14,820 through college commencement.
  • Prepare Your Child to Pursue Scholarships. Some scholarships are awarded IMG_9375based on grades and test scores, some stress essay and interview responses, and others go to students with strong resumes. So help your student do well academically, develop verbal and written communication skills, and persist in extracurricular and leadership activities she enjoys.
  • Identify a General Career Direction. He needn’t decide on cardiovascular surgery by age 15, but helping him develop in broad subject areas about which he’s passionate can save your student from being among the 80% who change majors — some two or three times — generating extra costs for extra courses.

High School through Junior Year

High School Senior Year:

  • Apply for Aid. Filing the FAFSA is a necessity. If your student’s seeking institutional or state aid, too, other application forms may be required.
  • Analyze Affordability When Selecting a College. Public data can help project what you’ll pay for a degree from each school to which your student is accepted.
  • Select a Good Fit. Fit helps reduce the chances of your student transferring, which amplifies tuition costs for repeating courses not accepted by his new school.

Why implement a College Finance Plan? Go to “Before, During, and After College: You Need a Plan!” for answers. A review of “During College” strategies will be posted on this website October 2, and “After College” strategies will be outlined here October 9. More in-depth discussions of individual strategies can be found here through the end of academic year 2017-18.

Contact College Affordability Solutions at (512) 366-5354 or collegeafford@gmail.com for free help if you have questions about your CFP.

Before College: College “Sticker Prices” Aren’t Necessarily Their Final Prices

This summer is the time for rising high school seniors to begin researching colleges they may want to attend. There’s much check out, including each school’s costs.

To get an idea of what it’ll cost to attend different colleges and universities, go to their websites and search for “Cost of Attendance 2018-19.” You might also want to use College Navigator from the National Center for Education Statistics, opening its IMG_6849“Tuition, Fees, and Estimated Student Expenses” page to track cost increases over the last four years.

Here’s an important point — 2018-19 college prices you see on websites and College Navigator are “sticker prices” and not necessarily final. Schools generally engage in “discounting” their tuition and fees and, sometimes, other student expenses.

Colleges offer discounts differently than auto dealers, although the end result is the same. Rather than reducing a student’s tuition and fees, they give him grants and especially scholarships to pay these charges. For recruiting purposes, prestigious institutional scholarship offers often impress families and help bring in students.

Public and private colleges both discount. A new study by the National Association of College and University Business Officers found that private non-profit colleges and universities provided institutional grants and scholarships to 87.9% of new freshmen and 78.5% of all undergraduates in 2016-17. Collectively, these awards discounted tuition and fees by 49.1% for freshmen and 44.2% for all undergraduates.

Why discount? One reason is increased price sensitivity by families still recovering from the recession. It’s also related to decreased numbers of traditional college-age students and increased competition from other institutions for, like all businesses, colleges must bring in customers to survive.

IMG_6850Not every student should expect grants and scholarships equal to the discounting percentages noted above. Financial need plays a role. So do the characteristics of students an institution seeks to enroll; some want higher SAT scores, or certain types of musicians, or students likely to succeed in various academic programs. Your student won’t know his actual discount rates until winter or early spring, when he receives official financial aid offers from the colleges to which he’s applied.

The important thing is this — don’t let a institution’s “sticker price” discourage your student from putting it on the list of colleges to which he’ll apply. If that price gets discounted, it may be much more affordable than he thinks.

Special Bulletin: Proposed Federal Budget Would Reportedly Makes Big Cuts in Programs for College Students and Graduates

The Washington Post reports it has received what a U.S. Education Department staff member described as “near final” documents showing the administration will IMG_6510recommend a 13.6% reduction in federal education spending next week. The budget proposal would reportedly affect federal financial assistance for college students as follows:

  • Child Care for Enrolled Parents: End a $15 million program helping to make child care affordable for low-income parents attending college.
  • Federal Direct Subsidized Loans: Make as yet unannounced cuts that could end this program, which currently serves financially needy students. If this happens, all federal loans for such students would be unsubsidized and begin compiling interest the day they are made — significantly increasing student borrowing costs.
  • Federal Pell Grants: Hold Pell Grants for the nation’s neediest undergraduates at their current levels ($606 to $5,920 for fall and spring combined). Due to inflation, this would decrease Pell’s future “purchasing power.” Some good news is that the budget would fund an extension of 2017’s summer Pell Grants in future years.
  • Federal Work-Study (FWS): Cut FWS funding by $490 million (almost half), significantly reducing federally subsidized on and off-campus jobs that financially needy students use to pay for college.
  • Income-Driven Repayment: Close down all current income-driven repayment plans available to federal college loan borrowers. These plans offer loan forgiveness for balances remaining after borrowers pay 10% to 20% of their incomes over 20 to 25 year periods. They would be replaced with a new income-driven option requiring payments equal to 12.5% of income and limiting loan forgiveness to balances still outstanding after 30 years of such payments.
  • Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF): Eliminate PSLF, which offers tax-free debt cancellation on federal student loan balances owed by ex-students in public service jobs after 10 years of on-time payment. Over 550,000 federal, state, local, and nonprofit employees are already registered for PSLF. It’s not yet clear whether they or public servants not yet registered would be cut off from It.IMG_6511

Presidents propose federal budgets, but Congress ultimately decides them. So if you support or oppose any of these proposed cuts, call or write your U.S. representative and senators to tell them how you feel.

College Affordability Solutions will post more bulletins on this website as additional information becomes available.

During College: Pell Grants Can Help Pay for Summer School 2017

Got an undergraduate who could benefit from summer school? Did she receive a Federal Pell Grant in the fall/spring? If so, here’s good news — Pell Grants will be available this summer!

Undergraduates who earn bachelor’s degrees in 4 years or less borrow 35% less in student loans, so this presents an opportunity for your student to speed her time to degree and reduce her college debt.

A new law funding the government through September includes an exception toIMG_6269 rules prohibiting Pell Grants for most summer students. So summer Pell recipients may get up to the same amount they received for a single semester or quarter earlier this academic year.

Summer Pell Grants rules are due by July 1, so we’ll have to wait for the actual terms and conditions of these grants. Also, Pell funds may not be available until early July, so your student should contact the financial aid office to explore short-term options (emergency loans, payment plans, etc.) for covering summer expenses until then.

Other things to remember about Pell and summer school . . .

Enrollment Status: To receive federal student aid for which she’s eligible, including Pell, your student must be a regular student in an eligible program of study. So she probably needs to take summer classes at the institution where she’s pursuing her degree, not at a community college as a “transient” student.

Grant Amount: Pell amounts are based on enrollment status — i.e. undergraduates enrolled full-time (generally 12 or more hours) get 100% of what they qualify for; students enrolled three-quarter time get 75%; half-timers get 50%; and those enrolled less-than-half-time get 25%.

IMG_6270Summer Costs and Other Summer Aid: Make sure your student avoids the trap of enrolling in summer courses but lacking sufficient funds to finish them despite her Pell Grant. The aid office’s website displays summer costs. Check out whether your student can get federal loans or other aid for summer — many Pell recipients use up their annual loan eligibility during fall/spring and some schools award all their work-study and state/institutional aid during fall/spring. Have your student call the aid office to see what’s available for summer.

This Summer Only: Summer Pell is currently available for 2017 only. Whether it’s there for future summers depends on what Congress does.

Affordable summer enrollment where she’s getting her degree may benefit your student more than summer employment or community college summer school. Check it out!

For strategies on getting the most out of the financial resources available to your student, contact College Affordability Solutions at collegeafford@gmail.com or (512) 366-5354.