Special Bulletin: Does National Collegiate Student Loan Trusts Supposedly Own Your Loans? Make Them Prove It!

If you borrowed private student loans for your postsecondary education, and if an organization called National Collegiate Student Loan Trusts (National Collegiate) asserts you owe loan payments to it, double check everything it says about how much you owe and whether it actually owns your loans.

The New York Times reports that courts across the United States have dismissed IMG_7740many educational loan debts supposedly owed to National Collegiate because its was unable to prove that it had actually purchased those loans from lenders who originally made them. And in at least one case, a court dismissed part of a college graduate’s debt after finding that some loans for which National Collegiate was billing her were for enrollment at a school she never attended.

Note: National Collegiate is a “secondary market” that buys private student loans after they’re made, giving it the right to collect what borrowers owe in principal and interest on those loans. It has been particularly aggressive in going to court against private student loan borrowers unable to repay their debts.

National Collegiate contracts with American Education Services to provide its borrowers with services and do routine collections on its loans. The Times reports it uses a collection agency called Transworld Systems to collect debts when borrowers fall behind on their payments.

If any of your private student loans are being collected by either of these companies, determine whether National Collegiate Student Loan Trusts says it owns them. To do this, contact American Education Services and/or Transworld Systems to inquire. If they list National Collegiate as the owner of any of your loans, double check your records to confirm whether you actually borrowed them. If not, ask for documents proving you borrowed the loans and establishing what the courts call a “chain of title” to prove National Collegiate’s ownership.

Note: There are no reports of any federal or state student loans being dismissed by IMG_7739courts because of the irregularities described above.

Never stop making payments on and debt you really do owe. This can cost you big bucks and ruin your credit rating. And never, ever, use false or misleading information to try to get out of any of your debt obligations. That’s called a criminal offense called fraud!

But if there are questions about debts National Collegiate Student Loan Trusts says you owe it, retain a law firm or seek help from your local legal aid society if necessary. Don’t get ripped off!

We’re on summer vacation at College Affordability Solutions, but this issue was too important to ignore. Join us next month when we again begin publishing regular weekly blogs.

Special Bulletin: IRS Data Retrieval Tool Back On-Line for Income-Driven Repayment Applications

Good news! The IRS Data Retrieval Tool (DRT) is once again operable for federal student loan borrowers requesting Income-Driven Repayment (IDR) plans.

When such borrowers apply for IDR plans on their federal student loans, they must provide information to the U.S. Department of Education data from their recent tax returns. The DRT the easiest and fastest way to do this but, in early March, the IRS made the DRT inoperable due to security concerns.

Now, new encryption has been added to the DRT. The Department of Education and IRS will also be back on-line to provide tax return data for the 2018-19 Free Application for Student Financial Aid (FAFSA) when that form becomes available this coming October 1.

Before College: Shop Comparatively Using the Financial Aid Shopping Sheet

Many colleges have begun sending newly admitted undergraduates “award letters” showing the types and amounts of financial aid they can expect if they enroll in those schools. If your high school senior hasn’t already received such letters, they’ll probably start arriving in the next few weeks.

So dust off your calculator because, just as with any major purchase, the key to college affordability is comparative shopping.

Unfortunately, no two award letters are alike. Each uses its own unique layout and terminology. Few offer consumer information you need to know about institutions. This makes it difficult to compare schools based on affordability.

img_5222That’s why the U.S. Department of Education created the “financial aid shopping sheet.” Thousands of colleges send it with their award letters, making it easier to compare key numbers about them.

The shopping sheet’s left side shows each school’s cost of attendance — the college’s “sticker price” for the upcoming academic year.

Next comes the grants and scholarships your student is set to receive at that college for that academic year. These discount sticker price to determine the college’s “net price.”

Then comes other types of financial aid — work-study, loans — being offered to help your student pay the school’s net price.

The shopping sheet’s right side also has useful data. These include 6-year graduation rates at universities and 3-year graduation rates at community colleges. Such rates show how schools compare to similar institutions in getting undergraduates across the finish line.

The sheet also discloses the percentage of the school’s alumni repaying their federal student loans three years after beginning to do so — indicating how well the school prepares students for gainful employment.

Finally, you’ll see the median amount the college’s students borrow in federal loans, and their median monthly payments. This can give a rough sense of how much debt your student might be burdened with to attend that school.

Schools use shopping sheets on a voluntary basis, but beware of colleges that don’t provide them. Why are they trying to make it more difficult for you to compare them with other institutions? What don’t they want you to know about their aid offers or graduation and borrowing data?

You should select a college based on many factors, but the shopping sheet gives you useful, easy-to-compare affordability information for this all-important decision.

College Affordability Solutions conducts affordability analyses on institutions students are considering, whether or not those institutions provide shopping sheets. Call (512) 366-5354 or email collegeafford@gmail.com for more information.

After College: “Late” and “Missed” are 4-Letter Words for Your Student Loans

If you graduated from college last spring after borrowing federal student loans, your loan servicer has already let you know the first of your monthly payment due dates. img_5066Chances are that date is this month.

This date is important. Pay on or before it and you’ll build a positive credit rating. Pay after it’s passed, or make no payment, and you’re immediately a delinquent borrower. Then your loan servicer may report your delinquency to the major credit bureaus right away (they must report it you when you’re 90 days delinquent). You’ll have an adverse credit history that’ll result in higher interest rates if you’re img_5065even able to borrow for a car or house; may stop you from renting an apartment or signing up for a cell phone or utilities; and could even stop you from getting a job.

As soon as you become delinquent, your loan servicer may also add collection costs equal to 18.5% of your debt to what you owe.

Fail to make any payment within 30 days of its due date and you’ll also pay a late fee equalling 6% of what you owe. Miss nine monthly payments in a row and you’re in default — at which point a government-hired collection agency will require you to repay your whole debt immediately. The government may also confiscate up to 15% of your salary and wages, your tax returns, and any money it owes you. It can also get permission from a judge to take real estate and other property you own. Finally, you’ll never be able to borrow another federal student loan while in default.

Fortunately, it’s easy to make your federal student loan payments on time. Enroll in an automatic debit plan and your payment will be deducted from your bank account on the same date every month. You’ll also reduce your interest rate by 0.25%.

If your monthly due date doesn’t work for you, contact your loan servicer and ask to change it. Do the same if you need to change your repayment plan to lower your required monthly month amount.

Need to postpone your payments for a while? You can do this without becoming delinquent. Contact your loan servicer and ask for a deferment or forbearance.

So don’t ever let yourself run late on your monthly payments or, worse yet, miss them altogether. Both produce nasty results, and they’re way too easy to avoid!

College Affordability Solutions has extensive experience with the ins and outs of student loan repayment. Call (512) 366-5354 or email collegeafford@gmail.com if you need confidential advice on managing your college debt.