During College: Save by Prepaying Unneeded Loan Funds Within 120 Days of Disbursement

So your student’s currently in college? And he borrowed a Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan for this fall? He can save a lot on that loan by prepaying during the next 6 weeks. This is worth considering, because only 38.6% of college seniors look back and feel all they borrowed was essential to continuing their education.

Federal regulations say any prepayment received within 120 days of disbursement must be used to reduce that disbursement’s principal — and interest and loan fees on the prepaid principal must be automatically cancelled, too.

IMG_9849For example, a college freshman prepays $100 of his fall 2017 Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan within this 120 day period. This’ll reduce the total amount he must repay by an additional $175. Actual savings will depend on his choice of the federal repayment plans he’ll be offered — a choice he’ll make after leaving school.

These regulations also apply to upperclassmen. Their savings may be a bit less, but they’re still significant.

How to do this? First, your student should check with his financial aid office to see if it’ll submit his prepayment for film. If so, he should follow its directions. Otherwise:

  • Do Some Research: The National Student Loan Data System has his most recent Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan disbursement date (i.e. “Loan Date”). It’ll also identify his federal student loan servicer and its mailing address.
  • Meet the 120-Day Deadline: He’ll write a check to his loan servicer for the amount IMG_9854he wants to prepay and mail it 7-10 days (for delivery and processing) before the 120th day after disbursement.
  • Direct the Prepayment’s Application: To make sure his prepayment goes 100% to his most expensive federal loan — that Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan — he should write “Apply to [INSERT LOAN DATE] Unsubsidized Loan” on his check’s memo line before mailing it.

But be careful. You student should only prepay funds he doesn’t need to finish the current term. So if he doesn’t already have a spending plan, help him build one when he’s home for Thanksgiving. More about this next Wednesday.

The right to prepay at any time without penalty helps make federal loans superior to most other forms of credit available to America’s college students. And prepaying within 120 days of disbursement saves extra money, making them even better!

College Affordability Solutions offers 40 years of experience in a wide variety of student finance issues, including student loan debt management. Contact us at (512) 417-7660 or collegeafford@gmail.com for cost-free consultations.

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After College: Save by Prepaying During Your Grace Period

Did you get your bachelor’s degree this past spring? While in college, did you borrow Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loans? If so, you’re fast approaching the last day of your 6-month “grace period.” The next day what you’ll repay on those loans could easily multiply.

IMG_9822Lenders charge interest on student and other loans they make, and what borrowers repay equals the principal amount they borrowed and the interest they’re charged. Interest on your Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan installments began building when you received them, and any of this interest outstanding at the end of your grace period gets added to those loans’ principal.

It’s a legal practice called “capitalization.” Many lenders do it, including the government on Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loans. Once capitalized, your outstanding interest gets added to your principal. This inflates the total amount you repay because, the greater your principal, the more interest you get charged as you repay it.

Fortunately, this can be prevented — if you can afford it — by prepaying your IMG_9824outstanding interest before capitalization occurs. Say you borrowed the maximum allowable Federal Direct Loan amount during each of the last 4 years. Assuming you earn the average starting salary for a 2017 graduate, every $100 you prepay during your grace period reduces the total amount you’d repay by an additional $94 to $113.

Here’s what to do:

  • Get Information: Identify your grace period end-date and get a projection on the interest you’ll owe on that date. Your federal student loan servicer should be able to supply both and, if necessary, you can obtain its contact information from the National Student Loan Data System.
  • Prepay Before Your Grace Period Ends: Prepay as much interest as you can. Ask your servicer how to send this prepayment electronically, or mail it a check 7-10 days before your grace period ends.

Any payment made before it’s due is a prepayment. You can prepay any time without penalty on Federal Direct Loans. Prepayments reduce outstanding interest first, then loan principal. So if you can prepay even more than interest during your grace period you’ll also diminish your loan principal, further shrinking the total you end up repaying.

Prepaying during your grace period will save you money in the long run, giving you more to invest and spend on other things. So use your grace period to prepay as much as you can!

Look here next Wednesday for how currently enrolled students can save even more in the total amount they repay.
Seeking ways to manage the repayment of your student loans? Consult College Affordability Solutions at no charge. Contact us at collegeafford@gmail.com or (512) 366-5354 to do so.