Special Bulletin: Congress Considering Cuts to Student Aid Programs

On Monday the White House released its budget proposal for Fiscal Year 2019, which begins this coming October. The prospective budget is similar to HR 4508, the “Promoting Real Opportunity, Success, and Prosperity through Education Reform” IMG_0890(PROSPER) Act. This is a bill designed to revamp federal higher education programs. It will soon to be debated in the House.

If your student is now or likely will be a federal financial aid recipient, contact your  U.S. Representatives and Senators to let them know your thoughts on the proposed budget and HB 4508. Why? If Congress passes either as written, several federal student aid programs would be reduced or eliminated.

Subsidized Federal Direct Loans: Currently, no interest is charged on these loans until six months after their undergraduate borrowers leave college. But they would end for those first borrowing on or after July 1, 2019. Even at current interest rates, which are expected to rise, this would increase the cost of borrowing the $27,000 maximum allowed over 4 academic years by at least $2,800.

Income-Driven Repayment: Four repayment options would be replaced by one repayment plan requiring ex-students to pay 12.5%, instead of the current 10%, of their discretionary income toward their federal college debts. The repayment period would last 15 years instead of 20 to 30 years for undergraduates, and 30 years for graduate students. Discretionary income is the amount a borrower’s income exceeds 150% of poverty-level.

Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF): Any student first borrowing a federal loan on/after July 1, 2019 would be ineligible for PSLF.

Federal College Work-Study (FCWS): The budget would reduce FCWS funding by 49.5%. FCWS currently helps over 630 thousand students earn more than $1 billion a IMG_0891year to pay college costs. Graduate students would become ineligible for FCWS.

Federal Pell Grants: College costs keep rising, but the budget proposes to limit Pell Grants to the same amount as in FY 2019 as this year.

Pell Grant eligibility would be extended to students in short-term programs providing certificates, licenses, or other credentials for “in-demand fields”. For-profit vocational schools usually offer such programs, but their certificate earners average 1.5% higher unemployment rates, 11% lower earnings, and $5,000 more in student debt than students earning similar certificates at community colleges.

Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity Grants (FSEOGs): The FSEOG program, which provides extra grant dollars to approximately one million of the nation’s neediest Pell Grant recipients, would be eliminated.

Contact College Affordability Solutions at (512) 366-5354 or collegeafford@gmail.com for a no-cost consultation you have questions about how to pay for college.


Special Bulletin: Tell Your Congressperson to Increase Federal Student Aid Appropriations

The U.S. House of Representatives’ Committee on Appropriations recently voted to send HR 3358 to the full House for debate and a vote. This bill appropriates funds forIMG_7979 federal student aid programs for federal Fiscal Year (FY) 2018.

Here’s a summary of HR 3358’s key financial aid provisions as currently written. But they’re not final yet, and you should tell your congressperson what you think about them. Visit during their August recess, or call or write them. For their contact information, go here and enter your zip code.

Federal Pell Grant

This program provides grants of $600 to $5,920 to the nation’s neediest students. It has a $4.3 billion surplus that could be used to increase the size of these grants or provide grants to additional needy students.

HR 3358 would reduce this surplus by $3.3 billion and keep Pell Grant amounts the same as they were in FY 2017. With inflation, this would reduce the Pell Grant’s “purchasing power” — the portion of college-related expenses covered by Pell. Furthermore, it would not provide Pell Grants to any more students.

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG)

FSEOG goes to the poorest Pell Grant recipients — mostly those with family incomes below $30,000 per year.

HR 3358 would put the same amount into FSEOG for FY 2018 as that program received for FY 2017. FSEOG would be unable to help any additional students and its purchasing power would diminish

IMG_7978Note: As Pell Grant and FSEOG purchasing power decline, it’ll be necessary for colleges and states to divert more of their grant and scholarship dollars to help Pell and FSEOG-eligible students. This would reduce the numbers of college and state awards available to students who are not needy enough to receive Pell and FSEOG, but who still need plenty of financial assistance to go to or remain in college.

Federal Work-Study (FWS)

Hundreds of thousands of needy college student get part-time jobs through FWS. Most of these jobs are on-campus and many are related to students’ majors.

The administration proposed to cut FWS appropriations by 50%. But HR 3358 rejects this proposal and keeps FY 2018 FWS funding the same as it was for FY 2017. Still, there would be little or no opportunity for additional numbers of students to secure FWS jobs unless the program receives more funding.

Time to Act!

HR 3358 could affect your student’s financial aid even if he doesn’t receive Pell Grant, FSEOG, or FWS. So don’t sit on the sidelines! Make your voice heard!

Special Bulletin: Proposed Federal Budget Would Reportedly Makes Big Cuts in Programs for College Students and Graduates

The Washington Post reports it has received what a U.S. Education Department staff member described as “near final” documents showing the administration will IMG_6510recommend a 13.6% reduction in federal education spending next week. The budget proposal would reportedly affect federal financial assistance for college students as follows:

  • Child Care for Enrolled Parents: End a $15 million program helping to make child care affordable for low-income parents attending college.
  • Federal Direct Subsidized Loans: Make as yet unannounced cuts that could end this program, which currently serves financially needy students. If this happens, all federal loans for such students would be unsubsidized and begin compiling interest the day they are made — significantly increasing student borrowing costs.
  • Federal Pell Grants: Hold Pell Grants for the nation’s neediest undergraduates at their current levels ($606 to $5,920 for fall and spring combined). Due to inflation, this would decrease Pell’s future “purchasing power.” Some good news is that the budget would fund an extension of 2017’s summer Pell Grants in future years.
  • Federal Work-Study (FWS): Cut FWS funding by $490 million (almost half), significantly reducing federally subsidized on and off-campus jobs that financially needy students use to pay for college.
  • Income-Driven Repayment: Close down all current income-driven repayment plans available to federal college loan borrowers. These plans offer loan forgiveness for balances remaining after borrowers pay 10% to 20% of their incomes over 20 to 25 year periods. They would be replaced with a new income-driven option requiring payments equal to 12.5% of income and limiting loan forgiveness to balances still outstanding after 30 years of such payments.
  • Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF): Eliminate PSLF, which offers tax-free debt cancellation on federal student loan balances owed by ex-students in public service jobs after 10 years of on-time payment. Over 550,000 federal, state, local, and nonprofit employees are already registered for PSLF. It’s not yet clear whether they or public servants not yet registered would be cut off from It.IMG_6511

Presidents propose federal budgets, but Congress ultimately decides them. So if you support or oppose any of these proposed cuts, call or write your U.S. representative and senators to tell them how you feel.

College Affordability Solutions will post more bulletins on this website as additional information becomes available.

Before College: It’s Good to Work as a Freshman, Just Not Too Much


Your daughter’s freshman year financial aid offer includes a work-study award which’ll provide her a part-time job while she’s enrolled. Should she or shouldn’t she accept this award?

Many parents don’t want their children to work at school, especially during their first year. Moms and dads worry about their children adjusting to totally new environments and rigorous, college-level course loads. They reason that the pressure of jobs will be too much.

Such concerns are sometimes legitimate. But research shows they’re often wrong. In fact, studies have long shown that freshmen who work while taking classes earn higher GPAs and persist at higher rates than freshmen who don’t. The key is to control the student’s work hours. Ten to 14 hours a week seems to be optimal for most freshmen.

On the other hand, GPAs fall and dropout rates rise as students work more and more hours beyond 14 per week. These “over-workers” report that they find it difficult to attend classes, meet with professors, and get to the library. Think about that last point — no other on-campus service is open longer each day than the library so, if your student can’t get there, she probably can’t access other academic support services.

But working 10-14 hours a week can have several positive effects. It helps reduceXBD201407-00853-03.TIF reliance on loans. It allows students to pay some of their own costs, giving them the motivation that comes from “investing” their blood, sweat, and tears to “earn” an education. And working students typically become better time managers.

On-campus work can provide students with a “home base” at colleges that sometimes seem overwhelmingly large. And on-campus supervisors know their employees are students first, then workers. This tends to make them more tolerant of schedules that work around exams and tests.

IMG_5891Finally, working while enrolled usually helps with job and graduate school searches. Many ex-supervisors — including faculty members — are willing to provide references, and college employment demonstrates “real world” experience, strengthening the student’s resume even if the work she did wasn’t related to her career choice.

So you may want to advise your student to accept work-study. Absent such an offer, point her toward the student employment office when she gets to campus to seek other part-time positions. Don’t let unfounded fears stop her from taking advantage of the many positive outcomes associated with working a controlled number of hours per week.

College Affordability Solutions brings 40 years experience to advising families and students on higher education funding strategies. Feel free to contact us if we can assist you.

Before College: Shop Comparatively Using the Financial Aid Shopping Sheet

Many colleges have begun sending newly admitted undergraduates “award letters” showing the types and amounts of financial aid they can expect if they enroll in those schools. If your high school senior hasn’t already received such letters, they’ll probably start arriving in the next few weeks.

So dust off your calculator because, just as with any major purchase, the key to college affordability is comparative shopping.

Unfortunately, no two award letters are alike. Each uses its own unique layout and terminology. Few offer consumer information you need to know about institutions. This makes it difficult to compare schools based on affordability.

img_5222That’s why the U.S. Department of Education created the “financial aid shopping sheet.” Thousands of colleges send it with their award letters, making it easier to compare key numbers about them.

The shopping sheet’s left side shows each school’s cost of attendance — the college’s “sticker price” for the upcoming academic year.

Next comes the grants and scholarships your student is set to receive at that college for that academic year. These discount sticker price to determine the college’s “net price.”

Then comes other types of financial aid — work-study, loans — being offered to help your student pay the school’s net price.

The shopping sheet’s right side also has useful data. These include 6-year graduation rates at universities and 3-year graduation rates at community colleges. Such rates show how schools compare to similar institutions in getting undergraduates across the finish line.

The sheet also discloses the percentage of the school’s alumni repaying their federal student loans three years after beginning to do so — indicating how well the school prepares students for gainful employment.

Finally, you’ll see the median amount the college’s students borrow in federal loans, and their median monthly payments. This can give a rough sense of how much debt your student might be burdened with to attend that school.

Schools use shopping sheets on a voluntary basis, but beware of colleges that don’t provide them. Why are they trying to make it more difficult for you to compare them with other institutions? What don’t they want you to know about their aid offers or graduation and borrowing data?

You should select a college based on many factors, but the shopping sheet gives you useful, easy-to-compare affordability information for this all-important decision.

College Affordability Solutions conducts affordability analyses on institutions students are considering, whether or not those institutions provide shopping sheets. Call (512) 366-5354 or email collegeafford@gmail.com for more information.