Special Bulletin: Federal Student Loans Will Be More Expensive in 2017-18

Published reports from Washington indicated that interest rates on Federal Direct IMG_6317Loans will be 0.69% higher for academic year 2017-18 than in 2016-17, making it more costly for students and their parents to borrow such loans.

Americans borrow more than $96 billion a year from the Federal Direct Loan Program. That’s almost 90% of all the loan dollars used to pay for college in the United States.

Here’s how the 2017-18 interest rates compare to interest rates for 2016-17:

Federal Direct SUBSIDIZED Loan                      4.45%                                     3.76%

Federal Direct UNSUBSIDIZED Loan                4.45%                                      4.45%

Federal Direct GRADUATE PLUS Loan             6.00%                                      5.31%

Federal Direct PARENT PLUS Loan                   7.00%                                      6.31%

IMG_6319It’s estimated that the new interest rates will result in a 2017-18 college freshman paying at least $80 more in interest than his 2016-17 counterpart (if both were to borrow the freshman Federal Direct Loan maximum of $3,500). So the new interest rates make it more important than ever to borrow conservatively — taking on as little debt as possible and minimizing the use of higher interest rate and unsubsidized loans.

Technical Stuff Worth Knowing

The new interest rates apply to loans whose first (or only) installments are disbursed to borrowers on/after July 1, 2017 but before July 1, 2018.

Federal Direct Loan interest rates are fixed, which means the rate for each loan first disbursed in a July 1-June 30 year remains the same from the date it’s first disbursed until the date it’s paid in full.

Federal Direct Loan interest rates aren’t set on a whim. Current law requires them to be raised or lowered based on the rate at which 10-year Treasury bills are sold at the last auction of such securities before June 1. Such Treasury bills sold for a higher rate this May than last May.

With 40 years experience in student loans, College Affordability Solutions can offer students and parents strategies for minimizing student loan indebtedness. Email collegeafford@gmail.com or call (512) 366-5354 for such assistance.

During College: Pell Grants Can Help Pay for Summer School 2017

Got an undergraduate who could benefit from summer school? Did she receive a Federal Pell Grant in the fall/spring? If so, here’s good news — Pell Grants will be available this summer!

Undergraduates who earn bachelor’s degrees in 4 years or less borrow 35% less in student loans, so this presents an opportunity for your student to speed her time to degree and reduce her college debt.

A new law funding the government through September includes an exception toIMG_6269 rules prohibiting Pell Grants for most summer students. So summer Pell recipients may get up to the same amount they received for a single semester or quarter earlier this academic year.

Summer Pell Grants rules are due by July 1, so we’ll have to wait for the actual terms and conditions of these grants. Also, Pell funds may not be available until early July, so your student should contact the financial aid office to explore short-term options (emergency loans, payment plans, etc.) for covering summer expenses until then.

Other things to remember about Pell and summer school . . .

Enrollment Status: To receive federal student aid for which she’s eligible, including Pell, your student must be a regular student in an eligible program of study. So she probably needs to take summer classes at the institution where she’s pursuing her degree, not at a community college as a “transient” student.

Grant Amount: Pell amounts are based on enrollment status — i.e. undergraduates enrolled full-time (generally 12 or more hours) get 100% of what they qualify for; students enrolled three-quarter time get 75%; half-timers get 50%; and those enrolled less-than-half-time get 25%.

IMG_6270Summer Costs and Other Summer Aid: Make sure your student avoids the trap of enrolling in summer courses but lacking sufficient funds to finish them despite her Pell Grant. The aid office’s website displays summer costs. Check out whether your student can get federal loans or other aid for summer — many Pell recipients use up their annual loan eligibility during fall/spring and some schools award all their work-study and state/institutional aid during fall/spring. Have your student call the aid office to see what’s available for summer.

This Summer Only: Summer Pell is currently available for 2017 only. Whether it’s there for future summers depends on what Congress does.

Affordable summer enrollment where she’s getting her degree may benefit your student more than summer employment or community college summer school. Check it out!

For strategies on getting the most out of the financial resources available to your student, contact College Affordability Solutions at collegeafford@gmail.com or (512) 366-5354.

Special Bulletin: Status of IRS Data Retrieval Tool

A key tool used by students seeking financial aid borrowers applying for income-driven repayment plans on their federal student loans is still offline. However, a new government announcement outlines a schedule for getting it back up and running.

In March, the government shut down the IRS Data Retrieval Tool (DRT), expressing concerns about the need for extra system security. Here’s where things are now according to a recent status announcement from the U.S. Department of Education —

DRT in October for Student Financial Aid Applicants: For the next 5 months, students will need to keep finding and using recent federal tax returns for themselves and their parents in order to accurately complete their Free Applications for Federal Student Aid (FAFSAs). The government’s announcement says it’ll be October 1 when a new, more secure DRT will become available to them.

DRT on May 31 for Student Loan Borrowers: Parents and ex-students seeking to certify their eligibility for one of the 4 federal student loan income-driven repayment plans will again be able to access to the DRT beginning May 31, the announcement says. Until then, they’ll need to keep submitting alternative documentation when applying for these plans. Alternative documentation could be paper copies of their federal tax returns or pay stubs.

If and when more information about this problem becomes available, College Affordability Solutions will post another bulletin.

After College: Give a Graduation Gift Worth More Than It Costs

About 2 million undergraduates will receive their degrees this year. Almost 70% of them will graduate after having borrowed, on average, over $30,000.

That’s a lot for someone just beginning his adult life and career. But the worst thing is, it probably isn’t all the debt students owe at commencement. Most undergraduates must borrow Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loans — which begin accumulating interest the day they’re made — to supplement their Federal Direct Subsidized Loans and meet their college expenses.

This interest keeps accumulating during each student’s 6-month post-graduation grace period. Students may pay down interest while in school and their grace periods, but most can’t afford to do so. And when the grace periods ends, outstanding interest is capitalized — i.e. added to principal — inflating the principal amount on which future interest gets charged.

Let’s say you’re giving a graduation gift to a fairly typical student who’ll receive his bachelor’s degree later this month. He borrowed the maximum amount of subsidized and unsubsidized loan for each of his 4 years — not unusual given the financial need of students from even middle-income households. By commencement, he’ll owe $19,000 in subsidized loan principal and $8,000 in unsubsidized loan principal.

But when his grace period ends in November, he’ll also owe almost $1,500 more in accumulated unsubsidized loan interest. If all that gets capitalized, he’ll repay a total over $34,000 for the $27,000 he borrowed. And that’s if he uses a 10-year standard repayment plan — the repayment plan that yields the smallest total amount repaid.

This is where your gift comes in. Give your graduate money to pay down some of the interest accumulated on his unsubsidized debt. You’ll actually help him reduce the total amount he repays on his total college debt by more than what you give. Take a look . . .

IMG_6172

The easiest way to do this? Specify that he use your gift solely to pay down outstanding unsubsidized loan interest, which he can look up on the National Student Loan Data System, and send that amount to his loan servicer (also identifiable through NSLDS) with a note saying he wants it all applied to his unsubsidized debt. Your gift will immediately be applied to lower interest on that debt.

Not a “sexy” graduation gift, but it’ll provide value in excess of what it costs, and that’s not a bad deal for you or your student!

For more strategies to minimize what gets paid on student loans, contact College Affordability Solutions at collegeafford@gmail.com or (512) 366-5354.

Before and During College: Summer Can Be Used To Reduce College Costs

Spring semester ends soon. After finals, many students will use the summer to cut their college costs. The payoff for doing so can be huge!

Lot’s of employers need student employees to help manage increased summer activity levels. Others look to student workers to fill in for regular employees on summer vacation.

Over the last 4 years — from the summer after high school graduation through the summer before his senior year — Jack banked about $2,000 a year from his summer IMG_6029jobs. This allowed him to forgo the $2,000 per year in Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan he would otherwise have needed to borrow for the costs of attending his university. It cut the principal and interest he’ll pay each month on his student loans by a third. It’ll also reduce the total amount he repays on those loans under the “standard” 10-year repayment plan by a whopping $11,200. That’s a darned healthy bite out of Jack’s borrowing costs.

IMG_6030Another cost saver is attending summer school at a community college close to home so the student doesn’t incur expenses for room and board. This is particularly effective during the summers after student’s freshman and sophomore years, when they’re likely to pick up courses that’ll count toward degree requirements at their universities.

Jill took this approach. Over two summers, she completed a total of 15 credit hours at her local community college. Tuition and required fees there were $117 per credit hour, versus $321 per credit hour at the university Jill attended fall through spring.

In doing this, Jill reduced the number of semesters it took to fulfill her university degree requirements from eight to seven. This cut her costs at that institution by $4,825 in tuition and fees and by $5,220 in room and board. So for $1,760, Jill cut her costs by $10,045 — a net savings of $8,285.

And the good news is that this isn’t an either/or proposition. Summer work? Summer community college classes? Many students do both!

Jack and Jill still get lots of summer “down time.” They still get to see friends they missed while away at school. And they still get to eat that good home cooking and to be with family. But their summers are also highly productive, because they significantly reduce the cost of their degrees — and what’s not to like about that?

Looking for strategies to keep college more affordable? Feel free to contact College Affordability Solutions at collegeafford@gmail.com or (512) 366-5354.

Before College: It’s Good to Work as a Freshman, Just Not Too Much

 

Your daughter’s freshman year financial aid offer includes a work-study award which’ll provide her a part-time job while she’s enrolled. Should she or shouldn’t she accept this award?

Many parents don’t want their children to work at school, especially during their first year. Moms and dads worry about their children adjusting to totally new environments and rigorous, college-level course loads. They reason that the pressure of jobs will be too much.

Such concerns are sometimes legitimate. But research shows they’re often wrong. In fact, studies have long shown that freshmen who work while taking classes earn higher GPAs and persist at higher rates than freshmen who don’t. The key is to control the student’s work hours. Ten to 14 hours a week seems to be optimal for most freshmen.

On the other hand, GPAs fall and dropout rates rise as students work more and more hours beyond 14 per week. These “over-workers” report that they find it difficult to attend classes, meet with professors, and get to the library. Think about that last point — no other on-campus service is open longer each day than the library so, if your student can’t get there, she probably can’t access other academic support services.

But working 10-14 hours a week can have several positive effects. It helps reduceXBD201407-00853-03.TIF reliance on loans. It allows students to pay some of their own costs, giving them the motivation that comes from “investing” their blood, sweat, and tears to “earn” an education. And working students typically become better time managers.

On-campus work can provide students with a “home base” at colleges that sometimes seem overwhelmingly large. And on-campus supervisors know their employees are students first, then workers. This tends to make them more tolerant of schedules that work around exams and tests.

IMG_5891Finally, working while enrolled usually helps with job and graduate school searches. Many ex-supervisors — including faculty members — are willing to provide references, and college employment demonstrates “real world” experience, strengthening the student’s resume even if the work she did wasn’t related to her career choice.

So you may want to advise your student to accept work-study. Absent such an offer, point her toward the student employment office when she gets to campus to seek other part-time positions. Don’t let unfounded fears stop her from taking advantage of the many positive outcomes associated with working a controlled number of hours per week.

College Affordability Solutions brings 40 years experience to advising families and students on higher education funding strategies. Feel free to contact us if we can assist you.

Before College: Make Decisions Now That Will Minimize College Debt

Soon after the upcoming college commencement season you’ll begin hearing it. “Who got me into all this debt?” or “My school made me take out all those loans!”

There’s truth in this. College costs keep rising. Grants and scholarships aren’t keeping up. But two other parties also contribute to rising collegiate debt — the student and, often, his parents.

Is your student spending conservatively — e.g. buying used textbooks from an online discount bookstore, not buying all his textbooks but accessing some through the campus library’s ebook collection?

Many off-campus residences sell themselves as “high amenity” facilities. But they’re IMG_5814also high rent. Is living in a new high-rise with a rooftop pool and granite countertops really necessary? Can your student survive someplace that’s older, plainer, and less costly? Can he split rent with one or more roommates, eat out less often, put a brown bag lunch in his backpack and cook more meals at home?

Does he absolutely need an automobile at school? He’ll likely pay hundreds to put it in some remote, vandalism-prone parking lot. Instead, can he use campus shuttle buses and municipal transit lines? Can he share rides home?

Can he work part-time? Contrary to popular belief, students who work 10-14 hours per week while enrolled perform better academically than students who don’t work at all.

Parents? You probably think your Expected Family Contribution (EFC) is too high. But EFC is based on a reasonable assumption — that you’ll max out your own financial 20091030family5049resources before asking your neighbors to pay for financial aid to send your student to college.

So can you downsize your vacations; maybe even turn some into “staycations?” Can you get another few years out of your car? Do you really need to hire out the house cleaning or yard work? Or can you redirect such discretionary spending to support your student?

Most colleges offer the maximum loan amounts for which students are eligible. But your student need not accept all that debt. Minimize his costs and maximize your EFC, then reject any loan amount you don’t expect to need. If you miscalculate, what you turn down can be reinstated later.

Remember, students who borrow to live like professionals while in college often live like students while paying off their debts after college! Keep this from happening to your student by downsizing or rejecting loan offers now.

College Affordability Solutions helps families identify strategies for minimizing higher education debt. Contact us at collegeafford@gmail.com or (512) 366-5354 to learn more,