College Affordability Solutions Topical Index

This index links to almost 90 different posts from the last two years, each describing one or more approaches that’ll postsecondary education more affordable. Feel free to review them for steps you can take to do this before, during, or after college

Visit this index whenever you want. And mark August 15, 2018, on your calendar. That’s when College Affordability Solutions will begin publishing fresh posts again every Wednesday to help students and families devise strategies for making a quality postsecondary learning less costly to you.

Before College

College Finance Plan

Cost Reduction Strategies

College Costs

College Search and Selection

Credit Cards

Deadlines

Dependent and Independent Students

FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid)

Financial Aid Application Processes

Financial Aid Offers

Grants

Money Management

Parent Borrowing

Private Student Loans

Saving and Investing for College

Scams and Rip-Offs

Scholarships

Seeking Financial Assistance

Student Loans

Tuition and Fees

Value of Postsecondary Education

Verification

During College

College Finance Plan

Cost Reduction Strategies

Credit Cards

FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid)

Financial Aid Offers

Grants

Money Management

Off-Campus Housing

Parent Borrowing

  • Parent Loans — Helpful Today, But A Potential Curse Tomorrow (Published March 7, 2018)

Private Student Loans

Scams and Rip-Offs

Scholarships

Seeking Financial Assistance

Student Loans

Tax Benefits for Higher Education

Working While in College

After College

College Finance Plan

Consolidation and Refinancing

Debt Forgiveness and Cancellation

Grace Period

Missed Payment

Repayment of College Loans

Repayment Assistance

Repayment Problems

Tax Benefits for College Loan Repayment

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Before and During College: Get Answers to These Questions Before Borrowing Private Student Loans (Part 2)

In Part 1 of this series we identified answers to get on “up-front” issues when IMG_2699comparing a private versus federal student loan. Today we recommend questions to ask about things that happen after you get your money, but which are nevertheless essential to determining which loan is better for you.

Repayment Begin

  • When must you begin repaying your debt?

Payments aren’t required on federal student loans while you’re enrolled at least half-time and during a “grace period” lasting six months for Federal Direct Loan Program (FDLP) loans and nine months for Federal Perkins loans. Private student loan repayment start dates vary by loan.

Deferment and Forbearance

  • Under what conditions may payments be temporarily postponed or reduced?
  • What happens to interest that accrues (builds up) during these postponement and reductions?
  • Must you pay a fee to get your payments postponed or reduced?

You may temporarily postpone or reduce your monthly loan payments through various deferments and forbearances. Interest doesn’t accrue on FDLP Subsidized and Federal Perkins loans during deferment, but keeps accruing on other federal loans during deferment and all federal loans during forbearance.

The government charges no fees for deferment or forbearance, but some private lenders do — if they offer deferments or forbearances at all.

Loan Consolidation

  • May my federal and private college loans be consolidated?
  • Does my interest rate change if I consolidate? How much?
  • Does consolidating change my repayment period or other terms and conditions?

An FDLP Consolidation loan pays off whatever federal student loans you choose, but not your non-federal debts.

FDLP fixes your consolidation loan interest rate at the weighted average of all the loans it pays off, plus .125%.

You can usually get lower monthly payments on an FDLP Consolidation loan, which get extended repayment periods based on their size:

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Repayment Plans

  • How long will you have to fully repay your debt?
  • Do you have different repayment options. If so, what are their terms and conditions (monthly payment amounts, etc.)?

The FDLP allows you to choose from seven different repayment plans. The standard plan requires a monthly payment amount sufficient to pay off your debt within 10 years. Four others help ensure you’ll not be overwhelmed by monthly payment amounts by making such amounts a percentage of your Adjusted Gross Income, even if this requires a repayment period longer than 10 years.

Loan Discharge and Forgiveness

  • May any portion of your debt be cancelled? If so, under what circumstances?

Most private student loans offer no opportunities for discharge or forgiveness. Federal student loan debts may be discharged or forgiven under various reasons, including Public Service and Teacher Loan Forgiveness.

College Affordability Solutions offers free advice and counsel on college borrowing based on 40 years experience in student financial aid and student loans. Call (512) 366-5354 or email collegeafford@gmail.com for such assistance.

Before and During College: Get Answers to These Questions Before Borrowing Private Student Loans (Part 1)

Private credit providers want to increase their share of the student loan market. So if you’ll be in college — including graduate or professional school — during 2018-19, you may be targeted by private student loan marketing campaigns. If you are, remember that old saying, “Let the buyer beware!”

Private lenders want to convince you to borrow loans that’ll maximize their profits. You want to borrow loans that are as inexpensive as possible and, since you can’t predict the future, that give you flexible repayment terms. To do this, you’ll need answers to questions about your private and Federal Direct Loan Program (FDLP) borrowing options.

Here are some questions to ask:

Interest

  • What’s the initial interest rate?
  • Is the interest rate ever subject to change? If so, when and on what basis? If the changed interest rate was place today, what would it be?
  • Am I responsible for interest that accrues (builds up) during all phases of the loan’s life? What happens to this interest when I’m not required to pay it?

Many private college loans offer “introductory” interest rates that are lower than FDLP interest rates. But these rates generally rise later. Conversely, every FDLP loan has a fixed interest rate that’ll never change:

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FDLP interest payments aren’t required while you’re enrolled at least half-time and for six months after you leave school. But interest accrues on all but FDLP Subsidized loans during these times and, if you don’t pay it, it’ll be capitalized (added to loan principal) when your grace period ends. Many private loans handle interest in a similar manner.

Credit Record

  • What creditworthiness standards must you meet to get the loan?

Applicants get rejected, or charged higher interest rates, if they don’t have lender-required credit scores. But Washington limits access only to FDLP Graduate and Parent PLUS loans for applicants with “adverse credit histories.”

Loan Fees

  • How much will I be charged to obtain my loan(s)?

Washington currently charges a 1.066% fee on FDLP Subsidized and Unsubsidized loans, and a 4.264% fee on FDLP Graduate and Parent PLUS loans. Private lenders may require larger or smaller fees. These fees are deducted from the loan money you receive.

Private loan marketing campaigns usually concentrate on a few positive highlights about what they advertise so, to get all the answers you need, you’ll have to dig through lender websites and maybe even make calls or send emails to lenders. In-depth information on FDLP loans is available in the government’s Federal Student Loans: Basics for Students booklet.

Next Wednesday
Look right here for even more questions to get answered before you
borrow private student loans.

Contact College Affordability Solutions at (512) 366-5354 or collegeafford@gmail.com for free consultations about how to compare your college borrowing options.

Before and During College: Prepare for Rising Student Loan Interest Rates

The Federal Direct Loan Program (FDLP) provides 89% of all postsecondary educational loans. Unfortunately, FDLP loans will soon become more expensive to borrow.

FDLP interest rates are set every May for loans made from July 1 through June 30. The 2018-19 rates will be 0.6% higher than in 2017-18, making this the third year in aIMG_2154 row during which they have risen.

Note: FDLP loans are “made” from July 1 through June 30 if, during this period, any portion of their initial installments go directly to students or are applied applied to what they owe their institutions.

Higher rates increase borrowing costs. For example, what if the lower 2017-18 interest rates versus the higher 2018-19 interest rates were to remain in place for the next four years? Depending on the borrower’s choice of repayment plan, the total amount repaid to the FDLP under the higher rates would jump by up to:

  • $2,755 for undergraduates borrowing the maximum amount each year for four years;
  • $7,144 for parents borrowing the national average of $10,226 per year to help their undergraduates earn four-year degrees; and
  • $7,338 for two-year master’s degree students borrowing $25,000 per year.

Why are rates rising? Federal law ties the interest charged on each FDLP loan to the rate at which the government auctions off 10-year Treasury notes every May. The rates at which such Treasury notes are auctioned rises as the economy improves, which it’s been doing since late 2015, so FDLP interest rates have been rising, too.

And assuming there’s no economic recession for the next few years, future FDLP interest rates will climb even higher.

Good news? Federal law fixes FDLP interest rate until loans are totally repaid, so their interest rates never rise. This helps make FDLP loans better than the “variable rate” educational loans offered by many private lending institutions.

Still, rising FDLP rates make college less affordable unless borrowing is reduced. Fortunately, there are ways to do this and still get a quality education, including, but not limited to:

So make plans now, because it’s going to be more important than ever to minimize college debt for 2018-19!

College Affordability Solutions brings 40 years of personal college finance and student loan experience to it’s no-cost consultations with customers. Contact it at (512) 366-5354 or collegeafford@gmail.com for such a consultation.

Before College: Get Ready for What It’ll Cost . . . Now!

Parents and students are often shocked by college costs, especially late in high school, when there’s little time to generate significant amounts to help cover these costs.

It’s well known that postsecondary institutions charge tuition, and that there’ll be expenses for books and class supplies and room and board while students attend college. There are other charges, too. But it’s the total cost that seems to catch families by surprise.

So let’s look at the most recent data about the average cost of college attendance for an academic year (fall through spring). And for a sense of how these costs grow, look at what they were 10 years ago:

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Yes, over the last decade the average cost of a year at college rose 25% at public 2-year institutions, 38% at public 4-year universities, and 36% at private 4-year universities.

At this rate, if today’s 8-year old begins college in 10 years, her freshman year will cost approximately $22,000 at a public 2-year, $35,000 at a public 4-year, and $69,000 at a private 4-year institution.

She may be able to reduce expenses by, for example, living at home while taking classes. But she’ll still encounter 5-figure costs:

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Sallie Mae’s most recent How America Pays for College report indicates that nearly 90% of 2016-17 families know their children are college-bound in preschool. But in 2016-17 only 13% of college parents had 529 plans to help cover postsecondary expenses and just 8% could devote parental savings to these costs.

The result? Sallie Mae’s report indicates that, in 2016-17 alone, 33% of undergraduates borrowed an average of $8,835 in federal loans and almost one out of 10 of college parents took out Federal Direct Parent PLUS Loans, at an average of $10,226 per loan, to help pay postsecondary expenses.

Many of today’s postsecondary parents lost their jobs, income, and savings during the 2007-09 Great Recession. This really limited what they could save for college.

But in general, Americans are now better off. Unemployment in March was 4.1% — less than half the March 2010 rate of 9.9%. And U.S. Median Household Income has risen steadily to be almost 20% higher than in 2010.

If you’re enjoying job security and prosperity, now is the time to start saving all you can for college — even if it’s only a small amount.

Ah, you may ask, but won’t my savings reduce my child’s eligibility for federal student aid? Yes. But the reality is that 62% of that aid comes in the form of loans.

So every dollar you save today can help your student — and you — reduce college debt in the future!

Next Wednesday: Why 529 plans are the best way to save for college.
Until then, contact College Affordability Solutions at (512) 417-7660 or collegeafford@gmail.com for free consultations about issues related to financing your child’s college costs.

 

During College: You Should Be Protesting If Your Student’s Not Detesting Cryptocurrency Investing!

It’s bad enough that 75% of college students gamble. But now another perilous student behavior has emerged. A recent survey by The Student Loan Report indicates that 21% of student borrowers invest in cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin.IMG_1834

As a responsible parent you of course advise your student not to gamble. But also urge him to stay away from cryptocurrency investments!

Unfortunately, these investments are easy to make. After loan and other aid money pays tuition and fees for an academic term, your student gets the remainder to cover that term’s books and other necessary expenses. Now he could have up to a few thousand dollars in hand.

He can invest these funds — hopefully in a safe and secure bank account, but also in high-risk opportunities such as cryptocurrencies. Wherever he invests, he’ll still need to pay for necessities like books, housing, and food as the term progresses.

IMG_1779What makes cryptocurrencies so dicey for college students? It’s what investment professionals call “volatility.” Cryptocurrencies can become really volatile really fast!

For example, Bitcoin’s value on January 10 was $14,890.72. But by February 5 it’s value dropped to $6,914.26 — a 54% loss! So if your student bought a $2,000 share in Bitcoin on January 10 and sold this share just 25 days later, he lost $1,080 of his investment! Meanwhile, thousands in costs for the term remain to be paid.

Some call Bitcoin the potentially biggest “bubble” in history. A $1,080 loss from his IMG_1782limited pool of funds could easily place your child among the 52% of college students facing high levels of food insecurity, or the 12% college students who are homeless.

Difficulty paying for basic needs undermines academic performance, and money shortages have long been among the most common reasons why students leave college without degrees, so cryptocurrency financial losses could also end up placing your student among the 25% who drop out every year.

Far better for your student to spend as conservatively as possible and, toward the end of the term, if he has money he doesn’t need, return it to the government. For every $100 of his spring Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan he returns within 120 days of its disbursement, Washington will immediately cancel all fees and interest applicable to that $100. The result is that for every $100 he returns, the total amount he’ll ultimately repay on this loan will be cut by up to $191!

There’s an old saying, “Never gamble unless you can afford to lose the money.” If your student needs loans and/or other financial aid to help pay for college, he certainly cannot afford to lose money on erratic investments such as cryptocurrencies!

College Affordability Solutions has 40 years of experience in counseling students and parents on ways to manage their dollars for college. Call (512) 366-5354 or email collegeafford@gmail.com for a no-cost consultation.

Before and During College: Parent Loans — Helpful Today, But a Potential Curse Tomorrow

IMG_1169Federal Direct Parent PLUS Loans. They’re often the way families fill the gap between their resources, financial aid, and costs their undergraduates incur at college. But parent PLUS loans have their pros and cons.

Parent PLUS loan advantages:

 

  • There’s no PLUS borrowing limit other than the cost of attendance for the student for whom you borrow (i.e. your “beneficiary”) minus her other financial aid.
  • The interest rate on each academic year’s PLUS loan is fixed so, unlike this rate on many private loans, it’ll never go up.
  • The only fee is a 1.069% federal loan fee.
  • Amounts you repay within 120 days of disbursement reduces principal and IMG_1150cancels interest and loan fee on that principal.
  • Your payments may be deferred while your beneficiary is enrolled at least half-time and during her 6-month post half-time grace period.
  • Payments may also be postponed under other federal deferment and forbearance programs.
  • Should you die or become totally and permanently disabled, or if your beneficiary dies, your PLUS debt will be discharged.

Parent PLUS loan downsides include:

  • The highest interest rate of all federal college loans. Currently 7.0%, this rate’s expected to rise on PLUS loans borrowed for the next few academic years. But with fixed rates, PLUS interest is still likely to be lower than variable rate private education loans.
  • To borrow a PLUS loan, you (or a cosigner) must have a sound credit history. IMG_1152Your credit history isn’t “sound” for PLUS if (1) when your credit report runs, you don’t owe over $2,085 that’s 90 or more days delinquent, or (2) for five years before your report runs, you’ve had no charge-offs, bankruptcies, defaults, foreclosures, repossessions, tax-liens, wage garnishments, or write-offs.
  • PLUS debt isn’t legally transferable to anyone else unless it’s privately refinanced.
  • Parent PLUS debt isn’t easily forgiven. Bankruptcy generally won’t discharge it, and it’s not eligible for the federal teacher loan forgiveness program. But, in addition to the discharges described above, it is eligible for Public Service Loan Forgiveness.

IMG_1151Borrow parent PLUS loans only as a resort, especially if you’re approaching retirement. Why? The Government Accountability Office recently found 17% of 65-74 year old parent borrowers had defaulted on such loans — subjecting themselves to expensive collection fees and the confiscation of their Social Security benefits and tax refunds. So while PLUS can be helpful today, it can be a curse tomorrow.

Note: College Affordability Solutions will be on “spring break” next week and so won’t be posting a blog. But look here again on Wednesday, March 21, for another post on issues related to keeping college affordable.

Contact College Affordability Solutions at (512) 366-5354 or collegeafford.gmail.com if you’re looking for a no-cost consultation on strategies for minimizing college costs.