After College: Were You Wrongly Denied Public Service Loan Forgiveness? There’s a Chance to Fix That!

Are you a Federal Direct Loan Program (FDLP) borrower who applied for Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) after completing a decade of public service employment? Did you do exactly what you were told to qualify for PSLF, then told you weren’t eligible because you used the wrong student loan repayment plan? If so, help is now available!

What is PSLF?

Normally, PSLF forgives your remaining FDLP debt after you use a qualifying repayment IMG_2908plan to make 120 qualifying monthly payments while performing qualifying employment.

What’s the Problem?

Congress recently found that student loan servicing personnel hired by the U.S. Education Department (ED) to administer FDLP steered untold numbers of public servants into FDLP repayment plans that didn’t qualify them for PSLF.

After faithfully making payments for 120 months under the repayment plans they were directed to use, FedLoans (the loan servicer administering PSLF) informed these public servants they didn’t qualify for PSLF because they used the wrong plans.

So Congress created a $350 million fund to help borrowers left in the lurch by this fiasco. Applications for this money are now being reviewed under a program ED calls Temporary Expanded Public Service Loan Forgiveness, or “TEPSLF.”

What Should You Do?

If you were denied PSLF because of this blunder, ask for loan forgiveness again by sending an email to TEPSLF@myfedloan.org. Here’s the model ED recommends for this email:

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Do You Qualify for TEPSLF?

TEPSLF will forgive what’s left of your FDLP debt only if:

  • You submitted a PSLF application that was denied solely because some or all of your 120 monthly payments were made under the Extended or Graduated repayment plans — which don’t qualify for PSLF; and
  • Your employer(s) certified that you completed a total of 120 months of qualifying employment; and
  • FedLoans Servicing accepted your employer certification(s); and
  • Your payment amount for the 12 months before you applied for TEPSLF, and the last payment you made before applying for TEPSLF, equaled or exceeded what you would have paid under one of the four income-driven repayment plans qualifying for PSLF. FedLoans Servicing will make this determination and, when it does, it’s supposed to notify you by email.

Hurry Up!

While $350 million sounds like a lot, it’ll be used to forgive debts on a first-come/ first-serve basis. So if your PSLF application was rejected over the type of repayment plan you used, don’t miss your chance — email FedLoans Servicing right away!

Looking for advice on managing the debts you took on for college? College Affordability Solutions has been 40 years experience with student loan repayment issues. Call (512) 366-5354 or email collegeafford@gmail.com to consult us at no charge.

Before and During College: Get Answers to These Questions Before Borrowing Private Student Loans (Part 2)

In Part 1 of this series we identified answers to get on “up-front” issues when IMG_2699comparing a private versus federal student loan. Today we recommend questions to ask about things that happen after you get your money, but which are nevertheless essential to determining which loan is better for you.

Repayment Begin

  • When must you begin repaying your debt?

Payments aren’t required on federal student loans while you’re enrolled at least half-time and during a “grace period” lasting six months for Federal Direct Loan Program (FDLP) loans and nine months for Federal Perkins loans. Private student loan repayment start dates vary by loan.

Deferment and Forbearance

  • Under what conditions may payments be temporarily postponed or reduced?
  • What happens to interest that accrues (builds up) during these postponement and reductions?
  • Must you pay a fee to get your payments postponed or reduced?

You may temporarily postpone or reduce your monthly loan payments through various deferments and forbearances. Interest doesn’t accrue on FDLP Subsidized and Federal Perkins loans during deferment, but keeps accruing on other federal loans during deferment and all federal loans during forbearance.

The government charges no fees for deferment or forbearance, but some private lenders do — if they offer deferments or forbearances at all.

Loan Consolidation

  • May my federal and private college loans be consolidated?
  • Does my interest rate change if I consolidate? How much?
  • Does consolidating change my repayment period or other terms and conditions?

An FDLP Consolidation loan pays off whatever federal student loans you choose, but not your non-federal debts.

FDLP fixes your consolidation loan interest rate at the weighted average of all the loans it pays off, plus .125%.

You can usually get lower monthly payments on an FDLP Consolidation loan, which get extended repayment periods based on their size:

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Repayment Plans

  • How long will you have to fully repay your debt?
  • Do you have different repayment options. If so, what are their terms and conditions (monthly payment amounts, etc.)?

The FDLP allows you to choose from seven different repayment plans. The standard plan requires a monthly payment amount sufficient to pay off your debt within 10 years. Four others help ensure you’ll not be overwhelmed by monthly payment amounts by making such amounts a percentage of your Adjusted Gross Income, even if this requires a repayment period longer than 10 years.

Loan Discharge and Forgiveness

  • May any portion of your debt be cancelled? If so, under what circumstances?

Most private student loans offer no opportunities for discharge or forgiveness. Federal student loan debts may be discharged or forgiven under various reasons, including Public Service and Teacher Loan Forgiveness.

College Affordability Solutions offers free advice and counsel on college borrowing based on 40 years experience in student financial aid and student loans. Call (512) 366-5354 or email collegeafford@gmail.com for such assistance.

Special Bulletin: Congress Considering Cuts to Student Aid Programs

On Monday the White House released its budget proposal for Fiscal Year 2019, which begins this coming October. The prospective budget is similar to HR 4508, the “Promoting Real Opportunity, Success, and Prosperity through Education Reform” IMG_0890(PROSPER) Act. This is a bill designed to revamp federal higher education programs. It will soon to be debated in the House.

If your student is now or likely will be a federal financial aid recipient, contact your  U.S. Representatives and Senators to let them know your thoughts on the proposed budget and HB 4508. Why? If Congress passes either as written, several federal student aid programs would be reduced or eliminated.

Subsidized Federal Direct Loans: Currently, no interest is charged on these loans until six months after their undergraduate borrowers leave college. But they would end for those first borrowing on or after July 1, 2019. Even at current interest rates, which are expected to rise, this would increase the cost of borrowing the $27,000 maximum allowed over 4 academic years by at least $2,800.

Income-Driven Repayment: Four repayment options would be replaced by one repayment plan requiring ex-students to pay 12.5%, instead of the current 10%, of their discretionary income toward their federal college debts. The repayment period would last 15 years instead of 20 to 30 years for undergraduates, and 30 years for graduate students. Discretionary income is the amount a borrower’s income exceeds 150% of poverty-level.

Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF): Any student first borrowing a federal loan on/after July 1, 2019 would be ineligible for PSLF.

Federal College Work-Study (FCWS): The budget would reduce FCWS funding by 49.5%. FCWS currently helps over 630 thousand students earn more than $1 billion a IMG_0891year to pay college costs. Graduate students would become ineligible for FCWS.

Federal Pell Grants: College costs keep rising, but the budget proposes to limit Pell Grants to the same amount as in FY 2019 as this year.

Pell Grant eligibility would be extended to students in short-term programs providing certificates, licenses, or other credentials for “in-demand fields”. For-profit vocational schools usually offer such programs, but their certificate earners average 1.5% higher unemployment rates, 11% lower earnings, and $5,000 more in student debt than students earning similar certificates at community colleges.

Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity Grants (FSEOGs): The FSEOG program, which provides extra grant dollars to approximately one million of the nation’s neediest Pell Grant recipients, would be eliminated.

Contact College Affordability Solutions at (512) 366-5354 or collegeafford@gmail.com for a no-cost consultation you have questions about how to pay for college.

After College: Pick Your Federal Student Loan Repayment Plan Carefully

If you graduated this past spring after borrowing Federal Direct Loans, your loan servicer will soon contact you about how to repay them. You can pick from as many IMG_8761as seven different repayment plans.

There’s information about these plans on the government’s federal repayment plan website. To see how each plan will work for you, use the government’s Federal Student Aid Repayment Estimator. Here’s a quick summary:

  • Standard Repayment: You get a standard plan if you don’t select any other repayment approach. It offers fixed monthly payments for up to 10 years (30 years for Direct Consolidation Loans). It’s the quickest way to eliminate your debt, and you’ll repay the least amount possible over time. But it’ll also generate the highest monthly payments of all the plans at your disposal.

Other plans lower your monthly payment amounts but generally increase the total amount you repay:

  • Extended Repayment: This is available only if you owe $30,000 or more in Federal Direct Loans. You’ll get a 25 year repayment period, but no loan forgiveness when it ends.
  • Graduated Repayment: This begins with low monthly payments that increase every two years regardless of your income. Your repayment period will be 10 years — 30 years if you consolidate. But there’s no loan forgiveness after 10 or 30 years.
  • Income-Based Repayment (IBR): Depending upon when you borrowed your IMG_8763first Federal Direct Loan, IBR sets your payment amount at 10% to 15% of each year’s Adjusted Gross Income (AGI) for a 20 to 25 year repayment period. If you still owe money when your repayment period ends, it’ll be forgiven.
  • Income-Contingent Repayment (ICR): ICR payments equal 20% of each year’s discretionary income, with debt you still owe after 25 years forgiven.
  • Pay As You Earn (PAYE): PAYE requires monthly payment amounts equal to 10% of your discretionary income every year for 20 years. Anything you may then owe will be forgiven. Discretionary income resets every 12 months based on your family income and size. Spousal college debt and AGI are also factors if you’re married and filing jointly.
  • Revised Pay As You Earn (REPAYE): REPAYE is identical to PAYE, except it gives you 25 years to repay and to await the forgiveness of any remaining loan balance.

Don’t forget, you can change repayment plans any time, so pick a plan and then, as your financial situation evolves, decide whether to switch to another plan.

College Affordability Solutions offers no-charge consultations on student loan repayment strategies. Contact us at (512) 366-5354 or collegeafford@gmail.com.

After College: Should You Refinance Your Federal Student Loan Debt?

If you owe on federal student loans borrowed to pay for college, and especially if you watch late night TV commercials, you may be wondering what “refinancing” is and whether it’s the right thing for you?

When you “refinance” you borrow a private loan to pay off your federal loans, IMG_6807pledging to repay the new loan according to terms and conditions stated in its promissory note.

This sounds a lot like a Federal Direct Consolidation Loan but it’s not. Your new loan isn’t coming from the U.S. government so your rights and responsibilities on it are no longer based on laws governing federal student loans. Instead, the promissory note you’ll sign with your new lender defines your rights and responsibilities, and certain benefits and protections you now enjoy most likely won’t be available on your new, private, refinancing loan. Here are some key examples:

Interest Rates: Your federal student loan interest rates are generally fixed for the life of those loans. Refinancing lenders stress that their loans offer lower interest rates than you’re currently being charged — thereby lowering your monthly payments and saving you money in the long run. However, their promissory notes IMG_6803may allow their lenders to raise their interest rates later, perhaps many times.

Deferment and Forbearance: You may defer or forbear payment on your federal loans under certain conditions — returning to college, part-time employment, financial distress, etc. But such postponements may not be available once you refinance, or at least not available for the same circumstances.

Repayment Flexibility: When you owe the government, you get a 6-9 month grace period and the right to make payment under any of 7 different federal repayment plans that best meet your needs. Some of these plans will lower your monthly payments. Your grace period may not be the same on a refinancing loan, and refinancing lenders don’t usually offer you all the same repayment options.

Debt Cancellation, Discharge, and Forgiveness: Federal law creates opportunities through which your debt to the government may be cancelled, discharged, or forgiven. Understand none of these opportunities exist on refinancing loans.

How can you tell if a refinancing loan is good for you? Closely scrutinize its promissory note. If that note doesn’t explicitly guarantee benefits and protections you may need or want, don’t borrow it!

Looking for ways to make your college debts more manageable? Feel free to contact College Affordability Solutions for help.

Special Bulletin: Public Service Loan Forgiveness in Jeopardy for Thousands!

If you work for a 501(c)(3) or some other tax-exempt organization and are hoping to have some of your federal student loan debt discharged under the Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) program, you may be in for a rude shock.

In a March 30 story, the New York Times reports that the U.S. Department of Education (ED) is taking the position that thousands of PSLF approval letters sent by FedLoan Servicing Servicing, the company ED hired and supervised to administer PSLF, were invalid.

FedLoan’s letters reportedly confirmed to borrowers that the jobs they held with nonprofit organizations qualified them for PSLF. However, many of these decisions wete retroactively declared invalid, and affected borrowers got no explanations or opportunities to appeal. According to the Times, four borrowers and the American Bar Association have gone to court against ED to restore those borrowers’ lost PSLF eligibility.

What should you do if you get caught up in this mess? Ultimately you, too, may have get a lawyer and take ED to court. But you should also:

* Contact your U.S. representative and senators to ask them to intervene with ED on your behalf; and

* File a complaint with the Consumer Finance Protection Bureau because members of congress interested in passing a bill to fix this problem will no doubt ask it provide accurate input on the problem and how many Americans are affected.

* Most of all, whether or not you’ve been informed that ED has invalidated correspondence you’ve received from FedLoan, keep working with your employer to submit your PSLF certification form once a year; and stay on top of of this issue by monitoring for developments related to it on the internet, in the news media, or on this website.

College Affordability Solutions will its best to keep you posted on this in the future.