After College: Were You Wrongly Denied Public Service Loan Forgiveness? There’s a Chance to Fix That!

Are you a Federal Direct Loan Program (FDLP) borrower who applied for Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) after completing a decade of public service employment? Did you do exactly what you were told to qualify for PSLF, then told you weren’t eligible because you used the wrong student loan repayment plan? If so, help is now available!

What is PSLF?

Normally, PSLF forgives your remaining FDLP debt after you use a qualifying repayment IMG_2908plan to make 120 qualifying monthly payments while performing qualifying employment.

What’s the Problem?

Congress recently found that student loan servicing personnel hired by the U.S. Education Department (ED) to administer FDLP steered untold numbers of public servants into FDLP repayment plans that didn’t qualify them for PSLF.

After faithfully making payments for 120 months under the repayment plans they were directed to use, FedLoans (the loan servicer administering PSLF) informed these public servants they didn’t qualify for PSLF because they used the wrong plans.

So Congress created a $350 million fund to help borrowers left in the lurch by this fiasco. Applications for this money are now being reviewed under a program ED calls Temporary Expanded Public Service Loan Forgiveness, or “TEPSLF.”

What Should You Do?

If you were denied PSLF because of this blunder, ask for loan forgiveness again by sending an email to TEPSLF@myfedloan.org. Here’s the model ED recommends for this email:

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Do You Qualify for TEPSLF?

TEPSLF will forgive what’s left of your FDLP debt only if:

  • You submitted a PSLF application that was denied solely because some or all of your 120 monthly payments were made under the Extended or Graduated repayment plans — which don’t qualify for PSLF; and
  • Your employer(s) certified that you completed a total of 120 months of qualifying employment; and
  • FedLoans Servicing accepted your employer certification(s); and
  • Your payment amount for the 12 months before you applied for TEPSLF, and the last payment you made before applying for TEPSLF, equaled or exceeded what you would have paid under one of the four income-driven repayment plans qualifying for PSLF. FedLoans Servicing will make this determination and, when it does, it’s supposed to notify you by email.

Hurry Up!

While $350 million sounds like a lot, it’ll be used to forgive debts on a first-come/ first-serve basis. So if your PSLF application was rejected over the type of repayment plan you used, don’t miss your chance — email FedLoans Servicing right away!

Looking for advice on managing the debts you took on for college? College Affordability Solutions has been 40 years experience with student loan repayment issues. Call (512) 366-5354 or email collegeafford@gmail.com to consult us at no charge.

Before and During College: Get Answers to These Questions Before Borrowing Private Student Loans (Part 2)

In Part 1 of this series we identified answers to get on “up-front” issues when IMG_2699comparing a private versus federal student loan. Today we recommend questions to ask about things that happen after you get your money, but which are nevertheless essential to determining which loan is better for you.

Repayment Begin

  • When must you begin repaying your debt?

Payments aren’t required on federal student loans while you’re enrolled at least half-time and during a “grace period” lasting six months for Federal Direct Loan Program (FDLP) loans and nine months for Federal Perkins loans. Private student loan repayment start dates vary by loan.

Deferment and Forbearance

  • Under what conditions may payments be temporarily postponed or reduced?
  • What happens to interest that accrues (builds up) during these postponement and reductions?
  • Must you pay a fee to get your payments postponed or reduced?

You may temporarily postpone or reduce your monthly loan payments through various deferments and forbearances. Interest doesn’t accrue on FDLP Subsidized and Federal Perkins loans during deferment, but keeps accruing on other federal loans during deferment and all federal loans during forbearance.

The government charges no fees for deferment or forbearance, but some private lenders do — if they offer deferments or forbearances at all.

Loan Consolidation

  • May my federal and private college loans be consolidated?
  • Does my interest rate change if I consolidate? How much?
  • Does consolidating change my repayment period or other terms and conditions?

An FDLP Consolidation loan pays off whatever federal student loans you choose, but not your non-federal debts.

FDLP fixes your consolidation loan interest rate at the weighted average of all the loans it pays off, plus .125%.

You can usually get lower monthly payments on an FDLP Consolidation loan, which get extended repayment periods based on their size:

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Repayment Plans

  • How long will you have to fully repay your debt?
  • Do you have different repayment options. If so, what are their terms and conditions (monthly payment amounts, etc.)?

The FDLP allows you to choose from seven different repayment plans. The standard plan requires a monthly payment amount sufficient to pay off your debt within 10 years. Four others help ensure you’ll not be overwhelmed by monthly payment amounts by making such amounts a percentage of your Adjusted Gross Income, even if this requires a repayment period longer than 10 years.

Loan Discharge and Forgiveness

  • May any portion of your debt be cancelled? If so, under what circumstances?

Most private student loans offer no opportunities for discharge or forgiveness. Federal student loan debts may be discharged or forgiven under various reasons, including Public Service and Teacher Loan Forgiveness.

College Affordability Solutions offers free advice and counsel on college borrowing based on 40 years experience in student financial aid and student loans. Call (512) 366-5354 or email collegeafford@gmail.com for such assistance.

After College: Should You Refinance Your Federal Student Loan Debt?

If you owe on federal student loans borrowed to pay for college, and especially if you watch late night TV commercials, you may be wondering what “refinancing” is and whether it’s the right thing for you?

When you “refinance” you borrow a private loan to pay off your federal loans, IMG_6807pledging to repay the new loan according to terms and conditions stated in its promissory note.

This sounds a lot like a Federal Direct Consolidation Loan but it’s not. Your new loan isn’t coming from the U.S. government so your rights and responsibilities on it are no longer based on laws governing federal student loans. Instead, the promissory note you’ll sign with your new lender defines your rights and responsibilities, and certain benefits and protections you now enjoy most likely won’t be available on your new, private, refinancing loan. Here are some key examples:

Interest Rates: Your federal student loan interest rates are generally fixed for the life of those loans. Refinancing lenders stress that their loans offer lower interest rates than you’re currently being charged — thereby lowering your monthly payments and saving you money in the long run. However, their promissory notes IMG_6803may allow their lenders to raise their interest rates later, perhaps many times.

Deferment and Forbearance: You may defer or forbear payment on your federal loans under certain conditions — returning to college, part-time employment, financial distress, etc. But such postponements may not be available once you refinance, or at least not available for the same circumstances.

Repayment Flexibility: When you owe the government, you get a 6-9 month grace period and the right to make payment under any of 7 different federal repayment plans that best meet your needs. Some of these plans will lower your monthly payments. Your grace period may not be the same on a refinancing loan, and refinancing lenders don’t usually offer you all the same repayment options.

Debt Cancellation, Discharge, and Forgiveness: Federal law creates opportunities through which your debt to the government may be cancelled, discharged, or forgiven. Understand none of these opportunities exist on refinancing loans.

How can you tell if a refinancing loan is good for you? Closely scrutinize its promissory note. If that note doesn’t explicitly guarantee benefits and protections you may need or want, don’t borrow it!

Looking for ways to make your college debts more manageable? Feel free to contact College Affordability Solutions for help.