College Affordability Solutions Topical Index

This index links to almost 90 articles. Each describes an wat to make college more affordable. Use them to learn how to do this before, during, or after college

And don’t forget! On August 15, 2018, new articles will be posted here every Wednesday.

Before College

College Finance Plan

Cost Reduction Strategies

College Costs

College Search and Selection

Credit Cards

Deadlines

Dependent and Independent Students

FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid)

Financial Aid Application Processes

Financial Aid Offers

Grants

Money Management

Parent Borrowing

Private Student Loans

Saving and Investing for College

Scams and Rip-Offs

Scholarships

Seeking Financial Assistance

Student Loans

Tuition and Fees

Value of Postsecondary Education

Verification

During College

College Finance Plan

Cost Reduction Strategies

Credit Cards

FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid)

Financial Aid Offers

Grants

Money Management

Off-Campus Housing

Parent Borrowing

Private Student Loans

Scams and Rip-Offs

Scholarships

Seeking Financial Assistance

Student Loans

Tax Benefits for Higher Education

Working While in College

After College

College Finance Plan

Consolidation and Refinancing

Debt Forgiveness and Cancellation

Grace Period

Missed Payment

Repayment of College Loans

Repayment Assistance

Repayment Problems

Tax Benefits for College Loan Repayment

During College: Now’s the Time for College Students to Search for Summer Jobs

Seventy percent of student summer jobs are filled before June. So prompt your student to start searching now!

The payoff can be substantial — work experience, a chance to apply classroom learning, a stronger resume, funds for college. At average summer wages, a student working June 1 through mid-August can bank over $3,300 by saving two-thirds of his gross earnings, and many summer positions pays above that average.

If your student doesn’t have a summer job, here are five steps for effectively seeking one. You can help with all of them.

  • Define Himself and His Best Fits: Start with a self-analysis. What can he bring an employer in terms of knowledge, skills, and volunteer or work experience? Then identify the characteristics of jobs in which he’s interested — type of work, location, hours, pay scale, etc. He may not get everything he wants, but this’ll help him get as close as he can.
  • Make Himself Presentable: Now’s the time for him to write his resume and IMG_0968cover letter, leaving them on his word processor for easy updating and tweaking if needed. And since most summer employers audit applicants’ social media, have him review his and delete anything that might be inappropriate.
  • Search . . . and Search More: You and your student should network by sharing his resume with adults you know. Ask about their employers — lines of business, work environments, whether they use students in summer? If a workplace sounds promising, request contact names and ask the adult to be a reference. And until he lands a position, your student should continue searching for job opportunities on internet job boards, search engines, and websites; in newspaper ads, etc.
  • Get Out There: Urge your student to apply online or send send his cover letter and resume to employers of interest before spring break if possible, then visit IMG_0969those employers in-person over spring break. Remind him to dress conservatively and review of notes on each employer for each visit. Whenever the opportunity arises, he should complete applications and participate in interviews. Help him prepare for interviews by developing answers to common questions and formulating his own inquiries.
  • Keep After It: Advise him to follow up on opportunities he likes with notes of thanks and, later, with calls expressing continued interest in those positions.

Whatever your student’s summer employment needs, the keys are to start early, be thorough, and remain persistent!

College Affordability Solutions offers practical advice on strategies for keeping college affordable. Call (512) 366-5354 or email collegeafford@gmail.com for no-cost consultations.

During College: Strategies for Your College Finance Plan

Your College Finance Plan (CFP) needs strategies for you and you student toIMG_9592 implement before, during, and after college. Let’s look at the “During College” phase.

Research at a major university indicates that, looking back, almost 4 out of every 10 seniors conclude part or all of their student loans weren’t essential for their educations. Therefore, some of these strategies focus on personal money management so students can spend and borrow less of the interest-bearing educational debt that, over time, increases college costs. These include:

IMG_9555Also, the faster your student gets her degree, the less cost and debt she’ll incur. Still, the latest national data show that only 39.8% of undergraduates earn their bachelor’s degrees within 4 years. Here are some strategies that’ll help your student graduate on-time, if not before:

 

Look here for why you need a CFP. You can find summaries of strategies for your plan’s “Before College” phase here. And next Wednesday there’ll be samples of “After College” strategies for your CFP here.
Beginning October 16, check this website every Wednesday for a more detailed account of a strategy you may want to use in your CFP’s before, during, or after college phase.