College Affordability Solutions Topical Index

This index links to almost 90 articles. Each describes an wat to make college more affordable. Use them to learn how to do this before, during, or after college

And don’t forget! On August 15, 2018, new articles will be posted here every Wednesday.

Before College

College Finance Plan

Cost Reduction Strategies

College Costs

College Search and Selection

Credit Cards

Deadlines

Dependent and Independent Students

FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid)

Financial Aid Application Processes

Financial Aid Offers

Grants

Money Management

Parent Borrowing

Private Student Loans

Saving and Investing for College

Scams and Rip-Offs

Scholarships

Seeking Financial Assistance

Student Loans

Tuition and Fees

Value of Postsecondary Education

Verification

During College

College Finance Plan

Cost Reduction Strategies

Credit Cards

FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid)

Financial Aid Offers

Grants

Money Management

Off-Campus Housing

Parent Borrowing

Private Student Loans

Scams and Rip-Offs

Scholarships

Seeking Financial Assistance

Student Loans

Tax Benefits for Higher Education

Working While in College

After College

College Finance Plan

Consolidation and Refinancing

Debt Forgiveness and Cancellation

Grace Period

Missed Payment

Repayment of College Loans

Repayment Assistance

Repayment Problems

Tax Benefits for College Loan Repayment

Advertisements

Special Bulletin: Congress Considering Cuts to Student Aid Programs

On Monday the White House released its budget proposal for Fiscal Year 2019, which begins this coming October. The prospective budget is similar to HR 4508, the “Promoting Real Opportunity, Success, and Prosperity through Education Reform” IMG_0890(PROSPER) Act. This is a bill designed to revamp federal higher education programs. It will soon to be debated in the House.

If your student is now or likely will be a federal financial aid recipient, contact your  U.S. Representatives and Senators to let them know your thoughts on the proposed budget and HB 4508. Why? If Congress passes either as written, several federal student aid programs would be reduced or eliminated.

Subsidized Federal Direct Loans: Currently, no interest is charged on these loans until six months after their undergraduate borrowers leave college. But they would end for those first borrowing on or after July 1, 2019. Even at current interest rates, which are expected to rise, this would increase the cost of borrowing the $27,000 maximum allowed over 4 academic years by at least $2,800.

Income-Driven Repayment: Four repayment options would be replaced by one repayment plan requiring ex-students to pay 12.5%, instead of the current 10%, of their discretionary income toward their federal college debts. The repayment period would last 15 years instead of 20 to 30 years for undergraduates, and 30 years for graduate students. Discretionary income is the amount a borrower’s income exceeds 150% of poverty-level.

Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF): Any student first borrowing a federal loan on/after July 1, 2019 would be ineligible for PSLF.

Federal College Work-Study (FCWS): The budget would reduce FCWS funding by 49.5%. FCWS currently helps over 630 thousand students earn more than $1 billion a IMG_0891year to pay college costs. Graduate students would become ineligible for FCWS.

Federal Pell Grants: College costs keep rising, but the budget proposes to limit Pell Grants to the same amount as in FY 2019 as this year.

Pell Grant eligibility would be extended to students in short-term programs providing certificates, licenses, or other credentials for “in-demand fields”. For-profit vocational schools usually offer such programs, but their certificate earners average 1.5% higher unemployment rates, 11% lower earnings, and $5,000 more in student debt than students earning similar certificates at community colleges.

Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity Grants (FSEOGs): The FSEOG program, which provides extra grant dollars to approximately one million of the nation’s neediest Pell Grant recipients, would be eliminated.

Contact College Affordability Solutions at (512) 366-5354 or collegeafford@gmail.com for a no-cost consultation you have questions about how to pay for college.

During College: Strategies for Your College Finance Plan

Your College Finance Plan (CFP) needs strategies for you and you student toIMG_9592 implement before, during, and after college. Let’s look at the “During College” phase.

Research at a major university indicates that, looking back, almost 4 out of every 10 seniors conclude part or all of their student loans weren’t essential for their educations. Therefore, some of these strategies focus on personal money management so students can spend and borrow less of the interest-bearing educational debt that, over time, increases college costs. These include:

IMG_9555Also, the faster your student gets her degree, the less cost and debt she’ll incur. Still, the latest national data show that only 39.8% of undergraduates earn their bachelor’s degrees within 4 years. Here are some strategies that’ll help your student graduate on-time, if not before:

 

Look here for why you need a CFP. You can find summaries of strategies for your plan’s “Before College” phase here. And next Wednesday there’ll be samples of “After College” strategies for your CFP here.
Beginning October 16, check this website every Wednesday for a more detailed account of a strategy you may want to use in your CFP’s before, during, or after college phase.

Before, During, and After College: You Need a Plan!

About 4 million babies will be born in the U.S. this year. Naturally, their parents want each of them to enjoy the American dream. Now, more than ever, that dream includes, even depends on a good education beyond high school.

But the dream is unraveling. It’s coming undone as the rising cost of college outpaces all but the wealthiest families’ ability to pay for it.

In 1998, the total cost of a year at a state college or university averaged $10,458. That was 27% of IMG_9377U.S. median household income. Eighteen years later this cost was $24,610, or 42% of median household income. At this rate, freshman year public college expenses for 2017’s newborns will average $33,224 — an astounding 56% of median household income.

Small wonder educational debt for recent college graduates averaged $34,000, or that 44 million Americans owe $1.4 trillion in such debt. Nor is it surprising that, in 2015, there were a million fewer students in college than in 2010; the first ever 5-year drop in our nation’s college enrollment.

How to ensure your child can afford college when he or she is ready to attend? It won’t be simple, and it won’t be easy. But a College Finance Plan (CFP) can help.

A CFP is like a mortgage — a decades-long undertaking. You (the parent) and your student (son or daughter) are its key players. It involves nothing exotic or fancy; just strategies to be adopted before, during, and after actual college enrollment. You’ll want to start implementing these strategies as early as you can, and stick to them.

A CFP won’t make college free, or even inexpensive. But collectively, its strategies can help make college costs more manageable so your student can access the best possible postsecondary education.

Want a quick look at strategies you should consider for the “Before College” phase? See Before College: Strategies for Your College Finance Plan. A review of “During College” strategies will be posted on this website October 2, and “After College” strategies will be outlined here October 9. IMG_9373You’ll also find more in-depth discussions of individual strategies here through the end of academic year 2017-18.

No matter where you and your student are in the college-going process, itake concrete steps to keep the cost of a postsecondary degree within your means. Start building your CFP now!

Got questions about college costs and how to deal with them? Contact College Affordability Solutions at (512) 366-5354 or collegeafford@gmail.com for help at no charge.

Special Bulletin: Tell Your Congressperson to Increase Federal Student Aid Appropriations

The U.S. House of Representatives’ Committee on Appropriations recently voted to send HR 3358 to the full House for debate and a vote. This bill appropriates funds forIMG_7979 federal student aid programs for federal Fiscal Year (FY) 2018.

Here’s a summary of HR 3358’s key financial aid provisions as currently written. But they’re not final yet, and you should tell your congressperson what you think about them. Visit during their August recess, or call or write them. For their contact information, go here and enter your zip code.

Federal Pell Grant

This program provides grants of $600 to $5,920 to the nation’s neediest students. It has a $4.3 billion surplus that could be used to increase the size of these grants or provide grants to additional needy students.

HR 3358 would reduce this surplus by $3.3 billion and keep Pell Grant amounts the same as they were in FY 2017. With inflation, this would reduce the Pell Grant’s “purchasing power” — the portion of college-related expenses covered by Pell. Furthermore, it would not provide Pell Grants to any more students.

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG)

FSEOG goes to the poorest Pell Grant recipients — mostly those with family incomes below $30,000 per year.

HR 3358 would put the same amount into FSEOG for FY 2018 as that program received for FY 2017. FSEOG would be unable to help any additional students and its purchasing power would diminish

IMG_7978Note: As Pell Grant and FSEOG purchasing power decline, it’ll be necessary for colleges and states to divert more of their grant and scholarship dollars to help Pell and FSEOG-eligible students. This would reduce the numbers of college and state awards available to students who are not needy enough to receive Pell and FSEOG, but who still need plenty of financial assistance to go to or remain in college.

Federal Work-Study (FWS)

Hundreds of thousands of needy college student get part-time jobs through FWS. Most of these jobs are on-campus and many are related to students’ majors.

The administration proposed to cut FWS appropriations by 50%. But HR 3358 rejects this proposal and keeps FY 2018 FWS funding the same as it was for FY 2017. Still, there would be little or no opportunity for additional numbers of students to secure FWS jobs unless the program receives more funding.

Time to Act!

HR 3358 could affect your student’s financial aid even if he doesn’t receive Pell Grant, FSEOG, or FWS. So don’t sit on the sidelines! Make your voice heard!

Special Bulletin: Proposed Federal Budget Would Reportedly Makes Big Cuts in Programs for College Students and Graduates

The Washington Post reports it has received what a U.S. Education Department staff member described as “near final” documents showing the administration will IMG_6510recommend a 13.6% reduction in federal education spending next week. The budget proposal would reportedly affect federal financial assistance for college students as follows:

  • Child Care for Enrolled Parents: End a $15 million program helping to make child care affordable for low-income parents attending college.
  • Federal Direct Subsidized Loans: Make as yet unannounced cuts that could end this program, which currently serves financially needy students. If this happens, all federal loans for such students would be unsubsidized and begin compiling interest the day they are made — significantly increasing student borrowing costs.
  • Federal Pell Grants: Hold Pell Grants for the nation’s neediest undergraduates at their current levels ($606 to $5,920 for fall and spring combined). Due to inflation, this would decrease Pell’s future “purchasing power.” Some good news is that the budget would fund an extension of 2017’s summer Pell Grants in future years.
  • Federal Work-Study (FWS): Cut FWS funding by $490 million (almost half), significantly reducing federally subsidized on and off-campus jobs that financially needy students use to pay for college.
  • Income-Driven Repayment: Close down all current income-driven repayment plans available to federal college loan borrowers. These plans offer loan forgiveness for balances remaining after borrowers pay 10% to 20% of their incomes over 20 to 25 year periods. They would be replaced with a new income-driven option requiring payments equal to 12.5% of income and limiting loan forgiveness to balances still outstanding after 30 years of such payments.
  • Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF): Eliminate PSLF, which offers tax-free debt cancellation on federal student loan balances owed by ex-students in public service jobs after 10 years of on-time payment. Over 550,000 federal, state, local, and nonprofit employees are already registered for PSLF. It’s not yet clear whether they or public servants not yet registered would be cut off from It.IMG_6511

Presidents propose federal budgets, but Congress ultimately decides them. So if you support or oppose any of these proposed cuts, call or write your U.S. representative and senators to tell them how you feel.

College Affordability Solutions will post more bulletins on this website as additional information becomes available.

Before College: It’s Good to Work as a Freshman, Just Not Too Much

 

Your daughter’s freshman year financial aid offer includes a work-study award which’ll provide her a part-time job while she’s enrolled. Should she or shouldn’t she accept this award?

Many parents don’t want their children to work at school, especially during their first year. Moms and dads worry about their children adjusting to totally new environments and rigorous, college-level course loads. They reason that the pressure of jobs will be too much.

Such concerns are sometimes legitimate. But research shows they’re often wrong. In fact, studies have long shown that freshmen who work while taking classes earn higher GPAs and persist at higher rates than freshmen who don’t. The key is to control the student’s work hours. Ten to 14 hours a week seems to be optimal for most freshmen.

On the other hand, GPAs fall and dropout rates rise as students work more and more hours beyond 14 per week. These “over-workers” report that they find it difficult to attend classes, meet with professors, and get to the library. Think about that last point — no other on-campus service is open longer each day than the library so, if your student can’t get there, she probably can’t access other academic support services.

But working 10-14 hours a week can have several positive effects. It helps reduceXBD201407-00853-03.TIF reliance on loans. It allows students to pay some of their own costs, giving them the motivation that comes from “investing” their blood, sweat, and tears to “earn” an education. And working students typically become better time managers.

On-campus work can provide students with a “home base” at colleges that sometimes seem overwhelmingly large. And on-campus supervisors know their employees are students first, then workers. This tends to make them more tolerant of schedules that work around exams and tests.

IMG_5891Finally, working while enrolled usually helps with job and graduate school searches. Many ex-supervisors — including faculty members — are willing to provide references, and college employment demonstrates “real world” experience, strengthening the student’s resume even if the work she did wasn’t related to her career choice.

So you may want to advise your student to accept work-study. Absent such an offer, point her toward the student employment office when she gets to campus to seek other part-time positions. Don’t let unfounded fears stop her from taking advantage of the many positive outcomes associated with working a controlled number of hours per week.

College Affordability Solutions brings 40 years experience to advising families and students on higher education funding strategies. Feel free to contact us if we can assist you.